Gordon Campbell | Parliament TV | Parliament Today | News Video | Crime | Employers | Housing | Immigration | Legal | Local Govt. | Maori | Welfare | Unions | Youth | Search

 


NetSafe strengthens ties with NZ Police

NetSafe strengthens ties with NZ Police as cyber enabled crime losses top $500,000 in February 2014


NetSafe Incorporated is pleased to announce two new additions to its governance team that will strengthen the capability of the organisation as it deals with an increasing workload in 2014.

The Auckland-based non-profit has developed new internal processes to fully assess all enquiries and reports made to its staff via the organisation’s free telephone helpline service, email, Facebook and the Orb cyber crime reporting website.

In February 2014, NetSafe responded to 650 incident reports across a wide range of digital challenges - including scams and frauds, phishing attacks, malware infections, and online trading complaints - and requests for information from educators and the media.

Just over $541,000 in losses was reported during the month as New Zealanders fell victim to inheritance and car buying scams or had their email, social networking and internet banking accounts compromised. Small businesses were struck by ransomware infections and job seekers and employers reported cloned websites and identity fraud as money mule recruiters continued to target the country.

New NetSafe Board appointments

Steve Honiss, Officer in Charge of the Police National Cyber Crime Centre (NC3) has joined the NetSafe board to fill the vacancy left by former police commissioner Howard Broad’s resignation late last year.

Rick Shera, NetSafe Chair, said “The strong relationships NetSafe has with New Zealand Police and other law enforcement agencies have been founded on Howard Broad’s involvement right from the start. With Howard leaving the board, we are thrilled to have Steve join us to continue to build on those relationships, which are essential to NetSafe’s work”.

Measuring New Zealand cyber-enabled crime

The organisation is working to a new ‘Digital Challenges Model’[1] in 2014 as the areas of cyber crime, cyber security and cyber safety continue to converge.

Of the 650 incidents NetSafe staff responded to, almost one in four were referred by New Zealand Police with Kiwis from across the country dealing with a constantly evolving range of challenges.

“Police stations from Invercargill to Tokoroa are advising internet users to contact NetSafe as many of the scams we see reported are operated by individuals outside of the country,” said Martin Cocker, NetSafe’s Executive Director.

“Fighting cyber crime requires the coordination and cooperation of a number of organisations and agencies. Many perpetrators will reside offshore in countries where law enforcement varies from New Zealand, so we need to set realistic expectations about what can currently be achieved by enforcement agencies. At the same time, we must strive to develop new processes to prevent and combat cyber crime,” says Detective Senior Sergeant Steve Honiss.

Strong relationships with agencies and educators

NetSafe triages all reports made by New Zealanders and is able to advise on the likelihood of recovering money sent overseas. The non-profit provides tailored advice on safety and security challenges and can assist with common computer security issues.

“We refer all serious or high value incidents to our government and law enforcement partners whether that be reports of children being groomed online or significant patterns of fraudulent activities,” said Cocker. “All reports are collated and compared to look for patterns and opportunities for enforcement or education interventions”.

Claire Amos, Deputy Principal, Hobsonville Point Secondary School is the second new appointment as an advisor on the NetSafe board and will utilise her experience as an acknowledged leader in e-learning.

“Her passion and expertise will be invaluable to NetSafe as the New Zealand education sector adapts to the opportunities and challenges of a 21st Century learning environment and the introduction of the Network for Learning,” said Cocker.

“I look forward to working with Steve and Claire. In addition to the governance strength they add to the board, their expertise in two of the most critical areas of our work will be of great benefit to the NetSafe team.”

- ENDS -

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Parliament Headlines | Politics Headlines | Regional Headlines

Digital Evolution: Scoop Independent News Launches "Operation Chrysalis"

From today Scoop is beginning a process of public consultation with the political, business and civil society groups it has served for the past 15 and a half years.

"It is hoped that in time - with new leadership and increased community engagement - the chrysalis will incubate a new kind of Scoop, one which can sustainably continue Scoop's Mission 'to be an agent of positive change'", says Scoop Founder, Editor and Publisher Alastair Thompson.

"As big publishing shrivels, public participation in contributing and spreading news has grown. Scoop has evolved with this wave by providing an independent platform, committed to upholding democracy, providing a voice to all, and providing the public easy access to information about decisions which affect them." More>>

 

Parliament Adjourns:

Greens: CAA Airport Door Report Conflicts With Brownlee’s Claims

The heavily redacted report into the incident shows conflicting versions of events as told by Gerry Brownlee and the Christchurch airport security staff. The report disputes Brownlee’s claim that he was allowed through, and states that he instead pushed his way through. More>>

ALSO:

TAIC: Final Report On Grounding Of MV Rena

Factors that directly contributed to the grounding included the crew:
- not following standard good practice for planning and executing the voyage
- not following standard good practice for navigation watchkeeping
- not following standard good practice when taking over control of the ship. More>>

ALSO:

Gordon Campbell:
On The Pakistan Schoolchildren Killings

The slaughter of the children in Pakistan is incomprehensibly awful. On the side, it has thrown a spotlight onto something that’s become a pop cultural meme. Fans of the Homeland TV series will be well aware of the collusion between sections of the Pakistan military/security establishment on one hand and sections of the Taliban of the other… More>>

ALSO:

Werewolf Satire:
The Politician’s Song

am a perfect picture of the modern politic-i-an:
I don’t precisely have a plan so much as an ambition;
‘Say what will sound most pleasant to the public’ is my main dictum:
And when in doubt attack someone who already is a victim More>>

ALSO:

Flight: Review Into Phillip Smith’s Escape Submitted To Government

The review follows an earlier operational review by the Department of Corrections and interim measures put in place by the Department shortly after prisoner Smith’s escape, and will inform the Government Inquiry currently underway. More>>

ALSO:

Intelligence: Inspector-General Accepts Apology For Leak Of Report

The Inspector-General of Intelligence and Security, Cheryl Gwyn, has accepted an unreserved apology from Hon Phil Goff MP for disclosing some of the contents of her recent Report into the Release of Information by the NZSIS in July and August 2011 to media prior to its publication. The Inspector-General will not take the matter any further. More>>

ALSO:

Drink: Alcohol Advertising Report Released

The report of the Ministerial Forum on Alcohol Advertising and Sponsorship has been released today, with Ministers noting that further work will be required on the feasibility and impact of the proposals. More>>

ALSO:

Other Report:

Leaked Cabinet Papers: Treasury Calls For Health Cuts

Leaked Cabinet papers that show that Government has been advised to cut the health budget by around $200 million is ringing alarm bells throughout the nursing and midwifery community. More>>

ALSO:

Get More From Scoop

 

LATEST HEADLINES

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Politics
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news