Gordon Campbell | Parliament TV | Parliament Today | News Video | Crime | Employers | Housing | Immigration | Legal | Local Govt. | Maori | Welfare | Unions | Youth | Search

 


Guiding principles on urban growth released

Guiding principles on urban growth released


More collaboration is needed to deal with the country’s burgeoning urban growth issues and future-proof our communities, according to a report released this week by the New Zealand Planning Institute (NZPI).

The NZPI’s “Managing Urban Growth” position paper addresses the many challenges posed by New Zealand’s rapid urban growth by presenting a series of planning principles which it believes will lead to more successful, functional and desirable urban areas.

NZPI Board member Robert Schofield says New Zealand is highly urbanised, with 86% of the population residing in urban areas, and that continues to grow rapidly.

“While growth varies throughout the country, and is concentrated in the upper half of the North Island, it is a significant national issue and reflects a worldwide trend,” Mr Schofield says.

“As the population in urban areas grows it places huge demands on these areas. We need to build many new homes, provide infrastructure to serve them and at the same time maintain a high quality of life and an attractive environment.”

Mr Schofield says poorly planned growth results in urban areas that fail to meet the needs of their communities.

“Every day we see examples in our cities and towns of people battling air and water pollution, traffic congestion, unsafe neighbourhoods, and other issues that detract from quality of life and the economy,” he says.

“On the other hand, well planned growth delivers highly competitive, good quality, desirable urban environments. It also provides people with a good choice in housing and living environments.”

Mr Schofield says well planned urban growth can also mitigate risks associated with natural disasters and their flow-on effects.

The position paper emphasises that well planned growth is essential to future-proof communities. It defines sustainable communities as those that are “supported by well-planned infrastructure such as transport, schools, hospitals, as well as a supply of energy, clean water and wastewater, and a healthy ecological environment.”

The paper says the following planning principles should underpin a collaborative approach to managing urban growth:

· Promote urban intensification

· Plan for quality and amenity in urban environments

· Plan for a mixture of compatible uses

· Encourage urban growth through redevelopment and greenfield development

· Provide for housing choice and diversity

· Provide a variety of transportation choices

· Encourage community collaboration in urban growth decisions

· Assess and manage environmental risk.

The NZPI is made up of planners who are involved in every aspect of planning for the growth of New Zealand’s towns and cities. Their roles include undertaking resource studies, providing advice, preparing and administering plans, as well as managing community consultation. The organisation advocates for best practice in urban growth management.

“We take the position that the future growth and change of our towns and cities needs to create well designed urban environments that support economic prosperity and create places where people want to live, work and play,” Mr Schofield says.

“These guiding principles aim to help make that a reality.”

The ‘Managing Urban Growth” position paper is available online at www.planning.org.nz.


ENDS

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Parliament Headlines | Politics Headlines | Regional Headlines

 

Parliament Today:

Werewolf: The Defence Pretence

Last year, the world began spending more money on weapons again, for the first time since 2011... New Zealand belongs to a region – Asia and Oceania – where military spending rose sharply in 2015, by 5.4 per cent. More>>

ALSO:

Gordon Campbell: On Not Crying Foul, Argentina

So a couple of guys found to be criminally liable of environmental pollution in Argentina lodge an application with the Overseas Investment Office… in order to buy some prime New Zealand rural land. Seems that their factory back home had carelessly and/or intentionally discharged toxic waste into the Lujan river. Bummer... More>>

ALSO:

Urban & Rural: $303m To Merge And Modernise New Zealand’s Fire Services

Internal Affairs Minister Peter Dunne today announced funding of $303 million over five years to combine urban and rural fire services into one organisation from mid-2017. More>>

ALSO:

High Trust Regime: What Did The PM Tell His Lawyer About Foreign Trusts?

The Government stopped the IRD from reviewing New Zealand foreign trusts shortly after the Prime Minister’s lawyer wrote to the Revenue Minister claiming John Key had promised him the regime would not be changed. More>>

ALSO:

Road Crime: Wicked Campers Vans Classified As Objectionable

The definition of publication includes any "thing that has printed or impressed upon it, or otherwise shown upon it, 1 or more (or a combination of 1 or more) images, representations, signs, statements, or words", The Classification Office has previously classified such 'things' as billboards, t-shirts, and even a drink can. This is the first time the Classification Office has classified a vehicle. More>>

ALSO:

'When New' Repairs: Landmark EQC Settlement

The Earthquake Commission has cut a deal with 98 Canterbury homeowners that affirms the government entity's responsibility to repair earthquake-damaged property to a 'when new' state, as well as covering repairs for undamaged parts of a property and clarifying its position on cash settlement calculations. More>>

ALSO:

Gordon Campbell: On Kiwirail’s Latest Stint In The Dogbox

The denigration of Kiwirail continues. The latest review (based on a 2014 assessment) of the options facing the company have enabled Kiwirail to be hung out to dry once again as a liability and burden on the taxpayer. More>>

ALSO:

Royal Society Report: Good Opportunities To Act Now On Climate Change

There are many actions New Zealand can and should take now to reduce the threat of climate change and transition to a low-carbon economy, a report released today by the Royal Society of New Zealand finds... More>>

ALSO:

Get More From Scoop

 

LATEST HEADLINES

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Politics
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news