Gordon Campbell | Parliament TV | Parliament Today | News Video | Crime | Employers | Housing | Immigration | Legal | Local Govt. | Maori | Welfare | Unions | Youth | Search

 

Policy Being Considered for Psychoactive Substances Premises

Policy Being Considered for Psychoactive Substances Premises

8 April 2014

Another step has been taken on a policy to minimise harm from the sale of psychoactive substances in New Plymouth and Stratford districts.

Tonight (Tuesday) NPDC’s Policy Committee recommended a draft Local Approved Products Policy (LAPP) be approved for public consultation. The recommendation will be considered by the full Council at its meeting on 6 May.

The draft LAPP would restrict the sale of psychoactive substances in the two districts to only New Plymouth’s CBD, where no sales premises may be within:
• 100m of any other premises selling these products.
• 50m of any kindergarten, early childhood centre, school, education facility, youth centre, reserve or playground.

While councils are not required to develop a LAPP, such a policy would require any outlet of psychoactive substances to comply with its rules.

“The question for councils is how to minimise harm to the community from these substances while not bringing in rules that would amount to a de facto ban, which isn’t allowed under the law,” says Mayor Andrew Judd.

“A LAPP can’t restrict the number of premises or the hours they operate, but it can specify locations where psychoactive substances can and can’t be sold.

“We think that restricting sales to New Plymouth’s CBD where we already have CCTV cameras in place, as well as managing their density plus their distance to sensitive sites, could be a reasonable approach within the restrictions of the law.

“However I call on all community leaders, including the health board and members of Parliament, to come to the Council meeting on 6 May to object to this law that doesn’t allow us to ban these products, and send a strong message to MP Peter Dunne that he’s got this wrong.”

The report to the Policy Committee noted that sales of psychoactive substances in smaller New Plymouth communities such as Waitara, Oakura, Bell Block, and Inglewood would probably be inappropriate given the small size of their business areas and their close proximity to residential areas and other sensitive land uses (such as education facilities).

Stratford CBD’s area is only 350m by 270m and is surrounded by reserves and residential land, so managers at both councils consider it appropriate to treat Stratford in the same manner as the smaller business areas in New Plymouth District.

Stratford District Council is already consulting on the draft LAPP, with submissions closing tomorrow (Wednesday). At the end of NPDC’s consultation period, a joint Hearing Committee on behalf of both councils will hear submissions and make recommendations regarding the proposed policy.

ENDS

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Parliament Headlines | Politics Headlines | Regional Headlines

Gordon Campbell: On The
America’s Cup

The fact New Zealand now reigns supreme once again in the most sophisticated contest in the world’s most elite sport – yacht racing – can’t help but reflect the trajectory the country has been on since the 1980s...

Elite sport used to feel more like a collective, shared experience. It was our team, composed of people who lived and worked like us. Now, not so much. More>>

 

PM's Press Conference: Red Socks And Secret Tapes

Prime Minister Bill English began his post-cabinet press conference by explaining how well the National Party's annual conference went. He also mentioned today's announcement of changes to the EQC disaster insurance legislation and wished Emirates Team New Zealand well in the America's Cup. More>>

Max Rashbrooke: On How To Make Government More Open

International surveys, while often complimentary, have also pinpointed major weaknesses: political donations are badly regulated, for instance, and appointments to government boards frequently go to those with strong political connections. More>>

In Court: Hamilton Student's Lawsuit Over Climate Change Policy

A law student from Hamilton is preparing to challenge the Government in the High Court on Monday over what she says is a “failure” to properly address climate change. More>>

ALSO:

Gordon Campbell: On The Fallout From The Barclay Tape

This is hardly a case of cleaning out your desk and being turfed out onto the pavement. As others have pointed out, the disgraced Clutha-Southland MP will remain on the public payroll for three months until the election, and for three months afterwards. More>>

ALSO:

 
 
 
 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

  • PARLIAMENT
  • POLITICS
  • REGIONAL
 
 

Featured InfoPages

Opening the Election
 
 
 
  • PublicAddress
  • Pundit
  • Kiwiblog