Gordon Campbell | Parliament TV | Parliament Today | News Video | Crime | Employers | Housing | Immigration | Legal | Local Govt. | Maori | Welfare | Unions | Youth | Search

 


People with disabilities most adversely affected in crises

University of Canterbury expert says people with disabilities most adversely affected

April 13, 2014

A University of Canterbury expert says people with disabilities are among the most adversely affected during conflict situations or when natural disasters strike.

Adjunct Professor Dr David Mitchell says during such times disabled people experience higher mortality rates, have fewer available resources and less access to help.

Dr Mitchell has published two books with English publisher, Routledge. The first of these, Crises, conflict and disability, he co-edited with Valerie Karr from the University of New Hampshire in the United States.

This 27-chapter book questions how law, policies and regulations provide guidance, methods and strategies can help in people with disabilities following a disaster.

``What should people with disabilities know in order to be prepared for emergency situations? What lessons have we learned from past experiences?

``Two lessons from the Canterbury earthquakes show there should be an inclusive approach in emergency planning, preparedness, response and recovery processes with good representation of people with disabilities and their organisations.

``An understanding of disability should be part of any preparation and training of frontline personnel and emergency managers. Collaboration and cooperation between disability organisations, government and volunteers facilitate support to individuals with disabilities, building on local capacities.

``The book explains how refugees with disabilities are one of the most disenfranchised groups in the world. It examines how New Zealand resettles refugees with disabilities.

``Less than one percent of the world’s refugees are allocated resettlement opportunities. For refugees with a disability, resettlement options are even more limited. Once resettled, refugees face huge challenges of understanding and accessing support services in an unfamiliar cultural environment.’’

Dr Mitchell’s second book, What really works in special and inclusive education (second edition), is aimed at teachers and provides them with evidence-based strategies for teaching children with special needs they can immediately put into practice in their classrooms.

The book provides research-based approaches to improving the achievement of children who are experiencing difficulties in the New Zealand education system.

Each of the 27 strategies in the book has a substantial research base, a strong theoretical rationale and clear guidelines on their implementation, as well as cautionary advice where necessary.

The first edition has been widely used in countries as diverse as Finland and Ethiopia, while the second edition is currently being translated into Danish and Japanese, with the possibility of Chinese and Arabic translations being currently explored. It is prescribed as a text at the University of Canterbury’s College of Education.

Professor Mitchell says he hopes that the Ministry of Education will support the promotion of the book in New Zealand schools.

Ends

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Parliament Headlines | Politics Headlines | Regional Headlines

Gordon Campbell:
On The Kim Regime

During the Cuban Missile Crisis, the US had a very clear objective and eventually offered a quid pro quo of the removal of some of its own missiles from Turkey. This time, there’s no clarity about what the US is seeking, or offering.

It hasn’t helped that the US and the global media consistently agree on calling North Korea and its leadership “crazy” and “irrational” and urging it to “come to its senses”. When you treat your opponent as being beyond reason, it gets hard to comprehend what their strategy is, let alone work out the terms of a viable compromise. More>>

 

Recovery: Economic Impact Of Kaikōura Quake Revealed

The report details the impact on small businesses and tourism caused by disruptions to transport infrastructure and the economic impacts... The impact on New Zealand’s Gross Domestic Product (GDP) over the first 18 months following the earthquake has been estimated at $450-$500 million. More>>

ALSO:

Human Rights Commission: Urgent Need For Action On Seclusion And Restraint

Chief Human Rights Commissioner David Rutherford says that while the report makes for sobering reading, the focus should now be on how the recommendations can be used to reduce the occurrence of seclusion and restraint in New Zealand and, in circumstances where it is necessary, to improve practices. More>>

ALSO:

CORRECTIONS (March 2017):

SCHOOL SECLUSION ROOMS (2016):

$11bn Capital Spend, New Debt Target: Steven Joyce On Budget Priorities

First, delivering better public services for a growing country – providing all New Zealanders with the opportunity to lead successful independent lives... And finally, we remain committed to reducing the tax burden and in particular the impact of marginal tax rates on lower and middle income earners, when we have the room to do so. More>>

ALSO:

JustSpeak Report: Bail Changes To Blame For New Billion Dollar Prison

In 2013 criminal justice spending was falling and the Government was mulling over what to spend the money on. 3 years later there are 10,000 people in prison and a new billion dollar prison is announced. More>>

ALSO:

Get More From Scoop

 

LATEST HEADLINES

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Politics
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news