Gordon Campbell | Parliament TV | Parliament Today | News Video | Crime | Employers | Housing | Immigration | Legal | Local Govt. | Maori | Welfare | Unions | Youth | Search

 

People with disabilities most adversely affected in crises

University of Canterbury expert says people with disabilities most adversely affected

April 13, 2014

A University of Canterbury expert says people with disabilities are among the most adversely affected during conflict situations or when natural disasters strike.

Adjunct Professor Dr David Mitchell says during such times disabled people experience higher mortality rates, have fewer available resources and less access to help.

Dr Mitchell has published two books with English publisher, Routledge. The first of these, Crises, conflict and disability, he co-edited with Valerie Karr from the University of New Hampshire in the United States.

This 27-chapter book questions how law, policies and regulations provide guidance, methods and strategies can help in people with disabilities following a disaster.

``What should people with disabilities know in order to be prepared for emergency situations? What lessons have we learned from past experiences?

``Two lessons from the Canterbury earthquakes show there should be an inclusive approach in emergency planning, preparedness, response and recovery processes with good representation of people with disabilities and their organisations.

``An understanding of disability should be part of any preparation and training of frontline personnel and emergency managers. Collaboration and cooperation between disability organisations, government and volunteers facilitate support to individuals with disabilities, building on local capacities.

``The book explains how refugees with disabilities are one of the most disenfranchised groups in the world. It examines how New Zealand resettles refugees with disabilities.

``Less than one percent of the world’s refugees are allocated resettlement opportunities. For refugees with a disability, resettlement options are even more limited. Once resettled, refugees face huge challenges of understanding and accessing support services in an unfamiliar cultural environment.’’

Dr Mitchell’s second book, What really works in special and inclusive education (second edition), is aimed at teachers and provides them with evidence-based strategies for teaching children with special needs they can immediately put into practice in their classrooms.

The book provides research-based approaches to improving the achievement of children who are experiencing difficulties in the New Zealand education system.

Each of the 27 strategies in the book has a substantial research base, a strong theoretical rationale and clear guidelines on their implementation, as well as cautionary advice where necessary.

The first edition has been widely used in countries as diverse as Finland and Ethiopia, while the second edition is currently being translated into Danish and Japanese, with the possibility of Chinese and Arabic translations being currently explored. It is prescribed as a text at the University of Canterbury’s College of Education.

Professor Mitchell says he hopes that the Ministry of Education will support the promotion of the book in New Zealand schools.

Ends

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Parliament Headlines | Politics Headlines | Regional Headlines

Another Leader Exiting: Statement From Peter Dunne

I have concluded, based on recent polling, and other soundings I have been taking over the last few weeks, that, the volatility and uncertainty notwithstanding, there is now a mood amongst Ōhāriu voters for a change of MP, which is unlikely to alter...

“I have therefore decided that it is time for me to stand aside, so the people of Ōhāriu can elect a new electorate MP. More>>

 
 

Gordon Campbell: On Labour’s Campaign Launch

One of the key motifs of Ardern’s speech was her repeated use of the phrase – “Now, what?” Cleverly, that looks like being Labour’s response to National’s ‘steady as it goes’ warning against not putting the economic ‘gains’ at risk. More>>

ALSO:

Shiny And Chrome: Nats' New $10.5bn Roads Of National Significance

National is committing to the next generation of Roads of National Significance, National Party Transport Spokesperson Simon Bridges says. More>>

ALSO:

Gordon Campbell: On Why Labour Isn’t Responsible For Barnaby Joyce

As a desperate Turnbull government tries to treat the Barnaby Joyce affair as a Pauline Hanson fever dream – blame it on the foreigners! We’re the victims of the dastardly New Zealand Labour Party! – our own government has chosen to further that narrative, and make itself an accomplice. More>>

ALSO:

Rail: Greens Back Tauranga – Hamilton – Auckland Service

The Green Party today announced that it will trial a passenger rail service between Auckland, Hamilton and Tauranga starting in 2019, when it is in government. More>>

ALSO:

Housing: Voluntary Rental Warrant Of Fitness For Wellington

Wellington City Council is partnering with the University of Otago, Wellington, to launch a voluntary Rental Warrant of Fitness for minimum housing standards in Wellington, Mayor Justin Lester has announced. More>>

ALSO:

Treaty: Agreement In Principle Signed With Moriori

“The Crown acknowledges Moriori was left virtually landless from 1870, hindering its cultural, social and economic development. The Crown also acknowledges its contribution to the myths that the people of Moriori were racially inferior and became extinct." More>>

ALSO:

 
 
 
 
 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

  • PARLIAMENT
  • POLITICS
  • REGIONAL
 
 

Featured InfoPages

Opening the Election