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State: still keeping you safe on the road this Easter

State: still keeping you safe on the road this Easter

The long-awaited Easter/ Anzac break is nearly upon us while the weather may have taken a turn for the worse in several parts of the country, many Kiwis will still be packing up their cars to take a road trip.

For the last decade, State Insurance has been on hand to help some 67,000 Kiwi drivers stay safe on the road by providing rest stops for travellers over Easter and Labour Weekend.

The community initiative has helped create awareness around driver fatigue, which, according to the Ministry of Transport, was a contributing factor in 27% of all crashes recorded during 2010 – 2012, half of which were fatal.

Fatigue can happen long before you fall asleep at the wheel. It can affect your reaction time, your ability to concentrate and your general understanding of the road and traffic around you.

But thats not all there is to consider. So just in time for the Easter/ Anzac break this weekend, State has launched a new app aimed at helping keep drivers safe on the road.

„State Stay Safe offers State customers discounts on new tyres, Warrant of Fitness (WoFs) and more so they can keep their car roadworthy – and therefore safer – for less.

State General Manager, Roger Wallace, said customers who download the app can also enjoy benefits like a free coffee or pie and car wash.

“State Stay Safe encourages drivers to check their vehicle is roadworthy at all times, not just when their WoF is due or they notice a problem,” Roger said.

“Fatigue is a major factor in a high number of road accidents – we hope benefits like a free coffee or pie will entice motorists to stop and take a break when they feel tired.

“If you notice any sign of fatigue, we would urge you to stop and get out of your car for at least 15 minutes.

“Find a safe place to pull over and if you need to take a nap, but not for more than 20 minutes as this can leave you feeling groggy. And if you do sleep, wait for at least ten minutes before you drive off again to make sure you are wide awake.”

Roger also had these handy hints to share to help you keep safe on the roads:

Watch out for signs of fatigue when you’re driving, including:

• Yawning, sore or heavy eyes, blurred or dim vision.

• Impatience, lack of concentration or slow reactions.

• Wandering over the centre-line or road edge.

• Droning or humming in your ears.

• Sweaty hands, hunger, thirst, stiffness or cramp.

• Poor gear changes or changes in driving speeds.

Ask a passenger to help you look out for these signs too.

Tips to avoid driver fatigue:

• Plan ahead. Map out your trip and look out for places youll be able to stop along the way for

• Get a good nights sleep – 8 hours the night before you go is preferable. Napping can help, but keep

it to 20 minutes or so and make sure youre fully awake before you set off again.

• Fresh air helps you stay awake – open the windows while driving.

• Rich, heavy meals and sugar make you tired. Pack some fruit and stick to light fresh food.

• Dont go it alone. Take someone with you to help you stay alert and watch for signs of fatigue.

•Flying can make you tired. If possible, avoid driving for a few days following long-distance air travel.

•Avoid driving during the hours when you would normally be sleeping or napping.

•Dont drink and drive. Even small amounts of alcohol will make fatigue much worse, especially if youre already tired. Pull over and take a break.

Ends

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