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Stereotypes Today: Beat Em or Join Em?

Stereotypes Today: Beat Em or Join Em?

Auckland, 1 May 2014 – So you’re Chinese. You work really hard, you’re super cheap and when you park wonky, you know what everyone’s thinking.

Presented by Future Dragonz, Stereotypes Today: Beat Em or Join Em? is a lively conversation event that unpacks cultural stereotypes and what it means to be Chinese today. It takes place on Wednesday 14 May in Auckland at AUT University.

“This third instalment in our Slanted series will peel back the good, the bad and the ugly around stereotypes. Our four talented speakers (Kimberley James; Mike Tsang; Sy Fong; Wendy Wang) share how stereotypes have shaped their very different journeys and reveal their favourite weapon to attack or defend them,” says co-organiser Wei Ou.

“The event platform also gives the audience an opportunity to examine its attitudes and reactions towards the topic,” he adds.

This special event will appeal to young professionals who face cultural tensions in their life as well as to anyone curious about the role and influence of stereotypes today.

For more details and to register for the event, please visit: www.futuredragonz.org.nz/events.html

AUT University is the event partner.

Future Dragonz
Future Dragonz (www.futuredragonz.org.nz) is New Zealand's leading Chinese young professionals' network, offering social networking and learning opportunities to local and overseas born Chinese. Events are designed to enhance members' social networks, professional growth and personal wellbeing. An initiative of the New Zealand Chinese Association (NZCA) Auckland, Future Dragonz launched in April 2010.

Slanted
Slanted is a conversation series created by Future Dragonz. It showcases the perspectives of personalities across a range of creativity, lifestyle and career pursuits. It celebrates Chinese voices and strives to uproot stereotypes historically imposed on us by others less informed. Some believe that Chinese people all look and think the same. With Slanted we offer our unique bent on things - through our eyes.

ENDS

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