Gordon Campbell | Parliament TV | Parliament Today | News Video | Crime | Employers | Housing | Immigration | Legal | Local Govt. | Maori | Welfare | Unions | Youth | Search

 

Internet Party to Pull Plug on Government Spying

May 2, 2014

Internet Party to Pull Plug on Government Spying

The Internet Party will pull the plug on out-of-control Government spying by immediately repealing laws which have given the country’s spy agency, the Government Communications Security Bureau (GCSB), unprecedented and chilling powers to snoop on Kiwis.

Internet Party chief executive Vikram Kumar said the GCSB Bill and theTelecommunications (Interception Capability and Security) Bill had put the privacy and Internet freedom of all New Zealanders in peril.

“And all in the name of national security and economic well-being. These pieces of legislation were rushed through by the Government in response to the Kitteridge Report, which found that the GCSB had been spying on New Zealanders illegally. They allow the Government and its Five Eyes intelligence partners – led by the United States’ National Security Agency – to undertake mass surveillance of New Zealand citizens and permanent residents without matching oversight or accountability.”

Mr Kumar said the Internet Party would remove the legal basis for the mass surveillance of New Zealanders.

“Kiwis going about their lives should not be subjected to having their personal information and online communications collected by Government spies and shared with foreign agencies in what is a clumsy and ultimately ineffective global spying dragnet.

“Mass surveillance isn’t making New Zealanders safer. There is absolutely no evidence that mass surveillance works, not even for national security. Even the usual ‘if you only knew what we know’ from secretive spy bosses and politicians can’t hide that fact. All these laws have done is trade away New Zealand’s sovereignty and independence to overseas powers.”

The Internet Party’s Privacy and Internet Freedom policy will also:
• ensure that the 88 people illegally spied on by the GCSB (as per the Kitteridge Report) are informed about the unlawful violation of their privacy and are issued an apology from the Government
• review intelligence co-operation agreements with a view to exiting the Five Eyes network
• initiate an end-to-end review of the GCSB Act and the role of that agency and New Zealand’s other intelligence agencies

In addition, the Internet Party will strengthen the Bill of Rights Act by elevating it to superior legislation, as well as entrenching it so that a future government could only change it under special circumstances. The Internet Party will initiate a fast-track review of the Act by the Law Commission to consider whether it is still fit for purpose in a digital age. This review could lead to an upgrade to the Bill of Rights Act or a companion Bill of Digital Rights.

The Internet Party’s members now have the opportunity to provide input into what will form full and final policy. Using an online discussion platform, Internet Party members will be able to view, discuss and contribute to high-level policy proposals before final policy is confirmed in the Internet Party’s manifesto.

“Our commitment is to making good policy by directly involving our members and taking advantage of their expertise and insights,” said Mr Kumar. “This is digital democracy in action.”

Discussion on the party’s Privacy and Internet Freedom policy is in progress on the Policy Forum https://internet.org.nz/forum, while the work-in-progress policy document is at https://docs.google.com/document/d/1qTAFzZSsBEoRuO2J1s4VMRsKJF-OilpGboYR1sRK25M/.

ENDS

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Parliament Headlines | Politics Headlines | Regional Headlines

Gordon Campbell: On The EU’s Beef With Google

There’s every indication that Google would be on a losing wicket if it chooses to fight the European Union competition watchdogs, who have just levied a $3.3 billion fine on the firm – with the prospect of worse to come if Google doesn’t quickly change the anti-competitive practices at the heart of a court battle that’s been seven years in the making.

Essentially, the case involved Google’s alleged abuse of the stranglehold it enjoys on the online advertising associated with its search activities. More>>

 

Legislation: Point England Housing Bill Passed

The passage of the Point England Development Enabling Bill through Parliament this evening will benefit Auckland with additional housing, help resolve Ngāti Paoa’s Treaty claim and improve the local environment and recreation facilities, Building and Construction Minister Dr Nick Smith says. More>>

ALSO:

Cyberducation: Digital Curriculum Launch And Funding Package

Consultation on new digital technologies content for the New Zealand Curriculum and Te Marautanga o Aotearoa, the Māori-medium Curriculum, was launched today by Education Minister Nikki Kaye. More>>

ALSO:

PM's Press Conference: Red Socks And Secret Tapes

Prime Minister Bill English began his post-cabinet press conference by explaining how well the National Party's annual conference went. He also mentioned today's announcement of changes to the EQC disaster insurance legislation and wished Emirates Team New Zealand well in the America's Cup. More>>

Max Rashbrooke: On How To Make Government More Open

International surveys, while often complimentary, have also pinpointed major weaknesses: political donations are badly regulated, for instance, and appointments to government boards frequently go to those with strong political connections. More>>

In Court: Hamilton Student's Lawsuit Over Climate Change Policy

A law student from Hamilton is preparing to challenge the Government in the High Court on Monday over what she says is a “failure” to properly address climate change. More>>

ALSO:

Gordon Campbell: On The Fallout From The Barclay Tape

This is hardly a case of cleaning out your desk and being turfed out onto the pavement. As others have pointed out, the disgraced Clutha-Southland MP will remain on the public payroll for three months until the election, and for three months afterwards. More>>

ALSO:

 
 
 
 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

  • PARLIAMENT
  • POLITICS
  • REGIONAL
 
 

Featured InfoPages

Opening the Election
 
 
 
  • PublicAddress
  • Pundit
  • Kiwiblog