Gordon Campbell | Parliament TV | Parliament Today | News Video | Crime | Employers | Housing | Immigration | Legal | Local Govt. | Maori | Welfare | Unions | Youth | Search

 

Undecided Voters Influenced by Smacking Policy

Undecided Voters Influenced by Smacking Policy


SMACKING LAW STILL STRONGLY REJECTED - POLL


A poll has found that more than one in four (27%) undecided voters say they are more likely to vote for a party pledging to amend the anti-smacking law.

The poll also found that almost three out of four voters want the anti-smacking law amended, and the support is strongest from NZ First, National and Labour party voters.

In the poll of 1,022 people undertaken by Curia Market Research, respondents were asked “If a political party promised that amending the law to allow light correctional smacking was a non-negotiable policy at the next general election, wouldthat make you more likely to vote for them, or less likely, or make no difference to your likely vote?”

Overall, 19% of respondents say they are more likely to vote for a party promising to amend the anti-smacking law and 14% less likely.

What was most significant was that of undecided voters, more than one in four (27%) of the undecided voters said they are more likely to vote for a party pledging to amend the anti-smacking law, and only 8% less likely.

“Undecided voters could determine the final make-up of Parliament, and they are sending a clear message to political parties that their policy of fixing the anti-smacking law will be a potential vote winner,” says Bob McCoskrie, National Director of Family First NZ.

Respondents were also asked “Do you think the anti-smacking law should be changed to state explicitly that parents who give their children a smack that is reasonable and for the purpose of correction are not breaking the law?

Overall, 72% of respondents backed a law change, with only 22% supporting the current law, and 6% unsure. In 2013, the support for a law change was 77% and in 2012 it was 63%.

80% of National supporters favour a law change, as do 69% of Labour supporters. The only supporters against a law change are Green party supporters.

“Politicians probably hoped that the opposition to the anti-smacking law would eventually disappear, but this poll simply reiterates that seven years on – and despite the government and the authorities masking the real effect of the law and its implementation - the law is seen of no real value, and any political party who promises to fix the law will benefit in the polling booth,” says Mr McCoskrie.

The nationwide poll was carried out during April and has a margin of error of +/- 3.2%.
READ the full Poll Results
ENDS

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Parliament Headlines | Politics Headlines | Regional Headlines

Gordon Campbell: On The
America’s Cup

The fact New Zealand now reigns supreme once again in the most sophisticated contest in the world’s most elite sport – yacht racing – can’t help but reflect the trajectory the country has been on since the 1980s...

Elite sport used to feel more like a collective, shared experience. It was our team, composed of people who lived and worked like us. Now, not so much. More>>

 

PM's Press Conference: Red Socks And Secret Tapes

Prime Minister Bill English began his post-cabinet press conference by explaining how well the National Party's annual conference went. He also mentioned today's announcement of changes to the EQC disaster insurance legislation and wished Emirates Team New Zealand well in the America's Cup. More>>

Max Rashbrooke: On How To Make Government More Open

International surveys, while often complimentary, have also pinpointed major weaknesses: political donations are badly regulated, for instance, and appointments to government boards frequently go to those with strong political connections. More>>

In Court: Hamilton Student's Lawsuit Over Climate Change Policy

A law student from Hamilton is preparing to challenge the Government in the High Court on Monday over what she says is a “failure” to properly address climate change. More>>

ALSO:

Gordon Campbell: On The Fallout From The Barclay Tape

This is hardly a case of cleaning out your desk and being turfed out onto the pavement. As others have pointed out, the disgraced Clutha-Southland MP will remain on the public payroll for three months until the election, and for three months afterwards. More>>

ALSO:

 
 
 
 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

  • PARLIAMENT
  • POLITICS
  • REGIONAL
 
 

Featured InfoPages

Opening the Election
 
 
 
  • PublicAddress
  • Pundit
  • Kiwiblog