Gordon Campbell | Parliament TV | Parliament Today | News Video | Crime | Employers | Housing | Immigration | Legal | Local Govt. | Maori | Welfare | Unions | Youth | Search

 


Lyttelton Port Workers Vote to Ratify Wage Deal

Lyttelton Port Workers Vote to Ratify Wage Deal

The Rail and Maritime Transport Union members working as Logistics Officers at Lyttelton Port have voted in favour of a wage deal reached with management.

As part of the deal, the Eleven Logistics Officers, who plan and run the operation of the loading and unloading of ships, stopped the limited industrial action that they had been taking since Friday 2 May, and withdrew notice of a two day strike over the weekend of 17-18 May.

RMTU South Island Organiser John Kerr said ‘the wage deal struck yesterday in a mediated negotiation delivers a 5.78% wage increase by next January, this comes in two stages – 2.85% backdated to January this year and another 2.85% from 19 January 2014,’

‘That means the members will be $50 a week better off straight away, with a bit of back pay as well, and by early next year their weekly wage will be $100 higher , ’ he said.

‘The members voted overwhelmingly to accept the deal and they are now going to sit down in a working group with management and discuss productivity related matters like staffing, succession planning, training, job content and so forth’ he said.

‘I think both management and ourselves can claim a win from yesterday’s bargaining. We get a wage increase, they avert a strike and we both get to talk about issues that concern us about how the port works,’ he said.

‘The breakthrough came when LPC extended the wage offer to include a second increase of 2.85% on top of the one already on the table,’ he said.

‘In the end members were pleased that after they stood their ground, they got a much fairer wage increase that values the work they do,’ he said.

Ends.

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Parliament Headlines | Politics Headlines | Regional Headlines

Q+A Transcript: CTU Call For 'National Standards' On Wages

‘If you look at countries who do better than us, who pay wages better, who have more competitive industries, more successful economies, they have systems where there are national standards. We need to bring ourselves that way. The trouble is the Contracts Act. The Contracts Act was a disaster. The Employment Relations Act was supposed to promote collective bargaining. It was supposed to address the inherent imbalance between employees and employers.’ More>>

 

Health Workers Respond: People's Mental Health Report Released

The People's Mental Health Review reinforces a recent YesWeCare.nz survey of 6,000 health workers, which found nine in 10 believe they don't have the staff or resources to deliver the care Kiwis need when they need it. More>>

ALSO:

More Mental Health:


Energy: Greens Launch Plan For Cheaper And Cleaner Electricity

$112 million for winter warm-up payments to help low-income households cover their power bills • setting a goal for 100 percent renewable electricity by 2030 (in average hydrological conditions) • an investigation into the electricity wholesale market. More>>

ALSO:

Gordon Campbell: On The Aged-Care Settlement

Until yesterday, a National government has always been the sworn enemy of women seeking justice in the workplace, in the face of gender-based pay discrimination. More>>

ALSO:

Get More From Scoop

 

LATEST HEADLINES

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Politics
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news