Gordon Campbell | Parliament TV | Parliament Today | News Video | Crime | Employers | Housing | Immigration | Legal | Local Govt. | Maori | Welfare | Unions | Youth | Search


Latest Leaks Show the Importance of Securing Internet

Latest Leaks Show the Importance of Securing Internet Users From
Pervasive Monitoring

InternetNZ is concerned by the latest revelations on matters of state surveillance and is asking the Government to answer to some questions. The organisation says that the latest information raises questions regarding the involvement of New Zealand's GCSB in certain NSA programmes, and reinforces the need for Internet technologists to find ways to mitigate overly broad surveillance programmes.

InternetNZ Chief Executive Jordan Carter says that there is documentary information (albeit leaked) suggesting the GCSB was part of a knowledge sharing group. New Zealanders deserve straight answers as to whether New Zealand intelligence organisations were active participants or just observers.

"The latest leaks appear to show that the GCSB was shown XKeyscore, the data harvesting software; that New Zealand was advised that there was spying on leaders of 'allies'; and that the NSA was putting backdoors into ICT companies' systems. What New Zealanders deserve to know is whether New Zealand took part in any of those activities.

"The Prime Minister has gone to great lengths to explain that New Zealand's GCSB was part of the Five Eyes but only peripherally so and that the GCSB only got involved "where necessary". These latest leaks seem to show that New Zealand's involvement could go deeper than that. We would ask that this be clarified, in public, at the earliest opportunity.

"Whatever New Zealand's involvement in particular Five Eyes programmes, the broader question of pervasive monitoring needs to be tackled. It risks reducing the use people can make of the Internet, and reducing the gains that can accrue from its rollout. Trust is vital in allowing online social and commercial interaction, but pervasive monitoring - whether by governments, corporates or criminals - puts those prospects at risk.

"Many in the Internet community view this pervasive monitoring as an attack requiring mitigation. The Internet Engineering Task Force, the body who works to develop technical Internet protocols, is working with its community to mitigate the perceived damage caused by this surveillance by designing protocols that make monitoring significantly more expensive or infeasible.

Mr Carter ended by noting that in the other Five Eyes countries there was serious debate going on about the level of surveillance. New Zealand doesn't seem to have started that conversation.

"When the GCSB and TICSA Bills were passed last year, there were a lot of angry voices. Since then, the public debate has faded. We think New Zealanders are ready to have a mature conversation about the relationship between privacy and security in the Internet era.

"Such a discussion will never be easy, but aiming to get the right approach can help inform later debate about New Zealand's links to the global surveillance system. Privacy and security are both important priorities; there will always be debate on how they relate to each other.

"New Zealand's challenge is to get this right in a way that protects people's rights and helps build a platform for New Zealand's future success," Jordan Carter says.

© Scoop Media

Parliament Headlines | Politics Headlines | Regional Headlines



1080 Threat: Police Arrest 60 Year Old Auckland Man

New Zealand Police have arrested a 60-year-old Auckland businessman in relation to the criminal blackmail threat to poison infant formula with 1080, made public in March this year. More>>


Canterbury Transition Bill First Reading: Government Hiding From ECan Submissions

The Government has radically reduced the amount of time for public submissions on their controversial ECan bill, says Labour’s Environment spokesperson Megan Woods... “Their shortened timeline could mean that instead of the usual six weeks, Cantabrians get just one week to submit their views on the bill." More>>


Gordon Campbell: On Our Apparent Inability To Stand Up To Australia

Alas, and only days before the first meeting between our Prime Minister John Key and the new Australian leader Malcolm Turnbull, this country is showing no sign of standing up for itself. Quite the reverse. We seem to be rolling over, and making gestures of appeasement. More>>


Health Not-So-Many Benefits: Auditor-General On Scrapped Cost-Saving Plan

The Auditor-General decided to look into the costs and benefits of HBL’s work in the health sector and, where possible, identify lessons... We found that several factors contributed to the difficulties that befell HBL and, in particular, the Finance, Procurement and Supply Chain (FPSC) programme. More>>


Wikileaks: TPP Intellectual Property Rights Chapter Released

“If TPP is ratified, people in the Pacific-Rim countries would have to live by the rules in this leaked text,” said Peter Maybarduk, Public Citizen’s Global Access to Medicines Program Director. “The new monopoly rights for big pharmaceutical firms would compromise access to medicines in TPP countries. The TPP would cost lives.” More>>


Redundancies: 120 Laws To Be Repealed

The Statutes Repeal Bill will remove 120 pieces of superfluous legislation, and parts of eight other acts. It is being consulted on before it is introduced to Parliament. “The proposed Bill would reduce the total number of public Acts in force by more than 10%,” Mr Joyce says. More>>


Gordon Campbell: On John Key’s Trip To Iraq

In the embedded press coverage on this trip, the absence so far of any evaluation of the wider context of what New Zealand thinks it is doing at Camp Taji has been striking. More>>


Labour: Parata Puts Brakes On Charter School Appraisal

“When the Ministry of Education recommended they compare the achievements of children at charter schools to those of their counterparts at state schools, the documents show Hekia Parata specifically prohibited them from doing so." More>>


Bad Day For Universities: Gun, Bomb Threats On Three Campuses

Dunedin Police are continuing their investigation into the threat made against the University of Otago. Staff are following a number of lines of inquiry, and police are working to verify the authenticity and source of the post. More>>


Get More From Scoop



Search Scoop  
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news