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Need for Māori Research is validated by the Government

The value of and need for Māori Research is validated by the Government

The announcement of $5 million per annum to maintain a Māori Centre of Research Excellence (CoRE) as of January 2016 will ensure the important, distinctive and multifaceted research that will serve the interests of Māori and New Zealand.


Ngā Pae o te Māramatanga (NPM) was delighted to receive the news confirming that Māori research has been valued and recognized by New Zealand’s government and that there is now permanent funding that will be secured through a contestable bidding process that will enable Māori research to expand.

“A Māori led, Māori focused Centre is essential for Māori research. The best Māori CoRE must be designed and proposed to achieve maximum value and impact to create the positive change we need and to best align with the aspirations of Māori. This investment will deliver benefits for Māori and New Zealand” says Associate Professor Tracey McIntosh, Director of NPM.

“This funding allows a critical, yet constructive, rethink of what and how we can best achieve the required goals and vision for our people. The Māori academic community will come together as a collective to take this opportunity to design the best model to move us forward. There is both depth and breadth in the Māori research community and we are all committed to ensuring that this is used to tackle our challenges and to seize opportunities for positive, economic, social, environmental and cultural gain. Through our collective processes and through the competitive bidding process we hope to be able to determine the best model to meet present and future objectives.”

NPM will strategize with its 20 existing and new partners, comprising all Universities, several wānanga, museums, a CRI, and independent community research centres to work towards a proposal to ensure the best possible solution and outcomes from this opportunity for the future of Māori research and Māori needs and opportunities.

“There has been an overwhelming response and support from all corners of the world, when the news that NPM did not make the shortlist for funding in February this year. The support for NPM and Māori Research has had a significant impact and been well and broadly recognised.”

“NPM is deeply appreciative to all the supporters, communities and colleagues for their efforts, thoughts, letters and stance to help produce this outcome that affirms the significance of Māori research.”

The new Māori CoRE funding is through Vote Tertiary Education and is subject to a competitive tender process where Māori researchers and Māori-led research institutes can bid to host and build on the work of NPM.

Ngā Pae o te Māramatanga (NPM) is a Centre of Research Excellence consisting of 16 participating research entities and hosted by the University of Auckland. NPM conducts research of relevance to Māori communities and is an important vehicle by which New Zealand continues to be a key player in global indigenous research and affairs. Its research is underpinned by the vision to realise the creative potential of Māori communities and to bring about positive change and transformation in the nation and wider world. Visit www.maramatanga.ac.nz
Ends

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