Gordon Campbell | Parliament TV | Parliament Today | News Video | Crime | Employers | Housing | Immigration | Legal | Local Govt. | Maori | Welfare | Unions | Youth | Search

 


The Letter: 19 May 2014


The Letter
19 May 2014

20 cent Company Tax Rate

Last week Jamie Whyte, using Treasury’s figures, issued a fully-costed Alternative Budget showing how by removing $4 billion of corporate and middle class welfare the top personal and company rate could be reduced to 24 cents. Jamie Whyte has used last week’s budget figures to update his alternative budget. It shows the National government could have reduced company tax to 20 cents.

It would double growth

Using widely accepted economic models a top personal tax rate of 24 cents and a company tax rate of 20 cents would double New Zealand’s standard of living in just 15 years. Not even the government claims that its new election year spending will lift growth. As Jamie Whyte said at a campaign meeting on Sunday, reducing the company tax rate is good economics but not good politics because companies do not vote. National’s budget just transfers money from one group to another. Electorally it works because the groups that receive money, families, are popular and numerous and those who pay, higher income individuals, and business are not popular.

Entitlement politics

The idea that people are entitled to other people’s money is now so widely believed, that when ACT questions the morality of entitlement neither voters nor politicians nor commentators can imagine any other way.

Voters

Jamie Whyte says he meets people who ask, “What are you going to do for me?”. Students want him to take money from others whose circumstances they cannot know about to pay for their degree. People who “believe that living in a democracy was something akin to being born into a mafia family. You get a say in who is going to be extorted and you can get your hands on a share of the proceeds”.

Our politicians are communists

To quote Jamie, “On The Nation it became clear that all my opponents, with the possible exception of Peter Dunne, did not believe in private property. On the topic of Auckland house prices, Winston Peters claimed that “we are selling our houses to foreigners”. When I pointed out that houses are not collectively owned and that individual New Zealanders were selling their houses to whomever they chose, he insisted that I was wrong about this. And, as you can imagine, Russell Norman and John Minto agreed that the government should decide who you may sell your house to – or, in other words, they agreed that it is not really your house.”

The media thinks entitlement is just common sense

The Letter does not care if Linda Clark gives media training to David Cunliffe. (It does not seem to be working). What worries us is Jamie Whyte’s observation about Linda Clark’s The Nation commentary: “Without any argument or evidence, she dismissed my detailed plans for cutting corporate and middle-class welfare and reducing tax rates as “mad”. It was just obvious to her that low government spending and low taxes is a mad idea.”

State Radio

Guyon Espiner interviewed Jamie Whyte on Radio New Zealand and claimed that ACT by lowering the top rate of tax from 33% to 24% was making a “gift” to people earning over $70,000 a year. He went further and suggested Jamie Whyte was trying to enrich himself. As Jamie says, “Of course, the government could tax all the money you earn. But it does not follow that your post-tax income is a gift from the government. You might as well argue that your TV is a gift from your local burglar because he has chosen not to steal it.” Jamie’s speech is onwww.act.org.nz

The politics of hate

In an earlier issue, The Letter predicted that Labour would come to regret joining in with Winston Peters in promoting policies that are thinly veiled attacks on the Chinese. In a multi-racial country racism is a genie that is very hard to rebottle. When our friend Michael Hirschfeld was Labour Party President, no Young Labour supporter would have thought it smart to blog as he did last week that Jamie Whyte is Jewish and that Jews care about nothing but money. But then Michael would not have approved of today’s xenophobia

The only victim of the Judith Collins Affair is…?

The only victim of the Judith Collin’s affair is Shane Taurima, the TV presenter who David Cunliffe has ruled out of standing for Labour. The TVNZ Inquiry found Mr Taurima had used his position at TVNZ to promote his Labour candidacy. To do this he used his TVNZ email account and held meetings after hours at TVNZ. The Inquiry could not put a monetary value on the use Mr Taurima made of the state broadcaster’s resources. (There is an airfare that is disputed and Mr. Taurima has repaid). In contrast, the Auditor General found that the Parliamentary Labour Party used hundreds of thousands of taxpayers’ dollars to illegally fund their election campaigns. No Labour MP was “ruled out” on those occasions. Shane is a victim of Labour’s new standard. Now it is just perception of wrong doing and you are guilty. If that is the standard there are going to be a lot more Shane Taurimas being ruled out from standing.


© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Parliament Headlines | Politics Headlines | Regional Headlines

Gordon Campbell:
On The Inadequate Response To Sexual Violence Prevention

On combatting sexual violence, the government has finally begun to undo some of the problems that were of its own making. Early in March, ACC launched the Integrated Services for Sensitive Claims scheme – a package aimed at improving the attitudes of ACC staff towards sexual violence victims, and offering them more substantive support.

Hopefully, this will help to reverse the damage done with the insensitive, punitive ACC policy put in place by the incoming Key government in 2009, which in some parts of New Zealand, saw 90 per cent of sexual violence victims being turned away by ACC. More>>

 

PARLIAMENT TODAY:

"To Help Families Get Ahead": April 1 Changes Kick In

Prime Minister John Key says Paid Parental Leave, the parental tax credit, the minimum wage and Superannuation will increase, while average ACC levies will fall, and more people will be helped in to home ownership... More>>

ALSO:

Climate: Ministers Exclude Emissions From ‘Environment Reporting'

The National Party Government has today revealed that the national environmental report topics for this year will, incredibly, exclude New Zealand’s greenhouse gas emissions, the Green Party said today. More>>

ALSO:

No Retrial: Freedom At Last For Teina Pora

The Māori Party is relieved that the Privy Council has cleared the final legal hurdle for Teina Pora who was wrongfully convicted of murder and sent to prison for 22 years. More>>

ALSO:

Germanwings Crash: Privacy Act Supports Aviation Safeguards In New Zealand

Reports that German privacy laws may have contributed to the Germanwings air crash have prompted New Zealand’s Privacy Commissioner to reassure the public that the Privacy Act is no impediment to medical practitioners notifying appropriate authorities to a pilot’s health concerns. More>>

ALSO:

Treaty: Taranaki Iwi Ngāruahine Settles Treaty Claims For $67.5mln

The settlement includes a $13.5 million payment the government made in June 2013, as well as land in the Taranaki region. The settlement also includes four culturally significant sites, the Waipakari Reserve, Te Kohinga Reserve, Te Ngutu o te Manu and Te Poho o Taranaki. More>>

ALSO:

Gordon Campbell: On A Funeral In Asia, The Northland By-Election, And News Priorities

Supposedly, New Zealand’s destiny lies in Asia, and that was one of Foreign Minister Murray McCully’s rationales for his bungled reforms at MFAT. OK. So, if that’s the case why didn’t Prime Minister John Key attend the state funeral on Sunday of Singapore’s founding leader Lee Kuan Yew? More>>

ALSO:

Werewolf Satire: Not Flag-Waving; Flag-Drowning

The panel choosing the flag options has no visual artists at all. Now, I’ve kerned the odd ligature in my time and I know my recto from my French curve so I thought I’d offer a few suggestions before they get past their depth. More>>

ALSO:

IPCA Reports: Significant Problems In Police Custody

In releasing two reports today, the Independent Police Conduct Authority has highlighted a number of significant problems with the way in which Police deal with people who are detained in Police cells. More>>

ALSO:

Inspector-General of Intelligence and Security: Inquiry Into GCSB Pacific Allegations

The complaints follow recent public allegations about GCSB activities. The complaints, and these public allegations, raise wider questions regarding the collection, retention and sharing of communications data. More>>

ALSO:

TPPA Investment Leak: "NZ Surrender To US" On Corporates Suing Governments

Professor Jane Kelsey: ‘As anticipated, the deal gives foreign investors from the TPPA countries special rights, and the power to sue the government in private offshore tribunals for massive damages if new laws, or even court decisions, significantly affected their bottom line’. More>>

ALSO:

Get More From Scoop

 

LATEST HEADLINES

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Politics
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news