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Commerce Commission supports Fraud Awareness Week

Commerce Commission supports Fraud Awareness Week


The Commerce Commission is urging people to wake up to scammers and remember the old adage; if it looks too good to be true, it probably is.

The Commission, along with the Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment (MBIE) is promoting Fraud Awareness Week (2-8 June) to help raise New Zealanders awareness about scams, how they can spot and report scams and how they can protect themselves and others from scams.

Every year thousands of New Zealanders are targeted by scammers. Most scams originate outside New Zealand and target millions of consumers worldwide. They often use spam tactics, sending their offers by email, text, phone or social media to target as many people as possible.

Commerce Commission Head of Investigations Ritchie Hutton says it’s important people stay vigilant.

“Don’t get drawn in by an overly attractive offer. If in doubt, don’t respond.”

“There are many disturbing stories of people sending money overseas, sometimes their life savings, looking for love or exceptional wealth and ending up losing everything. Scammers pray on human frailties so people need to be on guard.”

“Just last week the Commission was successful in a case against three men who were convicted and ordered to pay $140,000 for their part in a pyramid selling scheme. This scheme promised members the chance to make lots of money quickly but instead brought untold grief and hardship for people who could little afford it,” said Mr Hutton.

For information on how people can protect themselves they can read the MBIE website.

If you have been scammed, or know someone who has been scammed, report it to Scamwatch.

ends

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