Gordon Campbell | Parliament TV | Parliament Today | News Video | Crime | Employers | Housing | Immigration | Legal | Local Govt. | Maori | Welfare | Unions | Youth | Search

 


Mounting Calls for CYF Inquiry

Mounting Calls for CYF Inquiry

Family First NZ is repeating its call for an official inquiry in to the policies, procedures and the resourcing of CYF following an admission by CYF that they’re not coping, and increasing media coverage about the lack of support for caregivers.

“If CYF was a family, it would have had state intervention by now. There is increasing evidence of massive systemic failure in the organisation,” says Bob McCoskrie, National Director of Family First NZ.

“A review by the ministry of Social Development found that CYF is massively understaffed and that social workers do not have manageable caseloads and workloads. One of the key comments was ‘....we are working with people and children and all of our decisions affect their lives forever. It would be good to be able to have the time and capacity to think, analyse and reflect rather than acting in the moment...’,”

"CYF perform a necessary function but the lack of accountability to their process and procedures and their overwhelming workload should concern all families. There is no external and independent accountability. We need CYF to get it right, and we need to know that they’re getting it right. That evidence is not there,” says Mr McCoskrie.

Earlier this month, a report was released by the NZ Council for Educational Research which found that a survey of Principals were not positive about CYF support. 70% said CYF workers were ‘not useful’ or of ‘mixed use’. Only 4% said they were ‘very useful’.

A report last year commissioned by Social Development Minister Paula Bennett supported Family First’s call for an independent CYF Complaints Authority.

There have also been two recent cases of concern - the manager of a Whangarei Child Youth & Family home today found guilty on sex charges, while yesterday a jury's unanimous acquittal of a couple on all 14 charges of assault and ill-treatment of three boys between 2004 and 2010 brought by CYF against a caregiver couple.

“In the first case, these allegations of abuse occurred over a two year period (2011 - 2013) and disturbingly in a CYF-owned family home, where caregivers are directly sought and employed by CYF. There is obviously some huge flaws in the vetting system of caregivers, and in the level and frequency of care and communication between social workers and children in care. Parents of some of the victims are claiming to have gone to the police directly after hearing their children’s claims of abuse, and that CYF had been aware of the abuse for some time, yet failed to act swiftly and notify the families of the children. One would also question the idea of having multiple children, both males and females of varying ages in one place.”

“In the second case, it highlights that caregiving is a thankless task and CYF are making it even more thankless. Caregivers are being referred very difficult and demanding children yet are being rendered completely powerless, lacking support, and at risk themselves when dealing with unacceptable and defiant behaviour. This concern has been expressed to Family First by many other caregivers.”

“We’re are also questioning why the couple has been completely acquitted in court yet CYF claim they have committed abuse. Does CYF operate under a different law which excludes reality, common sense and the rule of law?”

“An official Inquiry will be in the best interests of the social workers, will result in public confidence and accountability for actions and decisions by CYF workers, establish appropriate workloads for social workers, and will protect families from abuse, and from abuse by the state,” says Mr McCoskrie.
ENDS

ends

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Parliament Headlines | Politics Headlines | Regional Headlines

Human Rights Commission: Urgent Need For Action On Seclusion And Restraint

A new independent report has outlined a number of serious concerns about New Zealand’s seclusion and restraint practices, says the Human Rights Commission...

Chief Human Rights Commissioner David Rutherford says that while the report makes for sobering reading, the focus should now be on how the recommendations can be used to reduce the occurrence of seclusion and restraint in New Zealand and, in circumstances where it is necessary, to improve practices. More>>

 

$11bn Capital Spend, New Debt Target: Steven Joyce On Budget Priorities

First, delivering better public services for a growing country – providing all New Zealanders with the opportunity to lead successful independent lives... And finally, we remain committed to reducing the tax burden and in particular the impact of marginal tax rates on lower and middle income earners, when we have the room to do so. More>>

ALSO:

JustSpeak Report: Bail Changes To Blame For New Billion Dollar Prison

In 2013 criminal justice spending was falling and the Government was mulling over what to spend the money on. 3 years later there are 10,000 people in prison and a new billion dollar prison is announced. More>>

ALSO:

Asylum: Dunne Accepts Hundreds Of Postcards On Refugee Categories

Minister Peter Dunne today accepted over 800 postcards calling for convention refugees to have the same entitlements as quota refugees... The campaign has been run with ActionStation together with LUSH Cosmetics, with postcards being signed in stores around New Zealand. More>>

ALSO:

Reshuffle: PM Announces Changes To Ministerial Portfolios

Prime Minister Bill English today announced the appointment of Gerry Brownlee as Minister of Foreign Affairs, Nathan Guy as Minister of Civil Defence, Nikki Kaye as Minister of Education and Mark Mitchell as Minister of Defence. More>>

ALSO:

Q+A Transcript: CTU Call For 'National Standards' On Wages

‘If you look at countries who do better than us, who pay wages better, who have more competitive industries, more successful economies, they have systems where there are national standards.’ More>>

ALSO:

Energy: Greens Launch Plan For Cheaper And Cleaner Electricity

$112 million for winter warm-up payments to help low-income households cover their power bills • setting a goal for 100 percent renewable electricity by 2030 (in average hydrological conditions) • an investigation into the electricity wholesale market. More>>

ALSO:

Get More From Scoop

 

LATEST HEADLINES

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Politics
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news