Gordon Campbell | Parliament TV | Parliament Today | News Video | Crime | Employers | Housing | Immigration | Legal | Local Govt. | Maori | Welfare | Unions | Youth | Search

 


NZ must not rest on its laurels over human trafficking

NZ must not rest on its laurels over human trafficking


On Saturday morning New Zealand time, the United States’ Department of State released the 2014 Trafficking in Persons Report. This report is the primary diplomatic tool by which the US government engages with other governments on the issue of human trafficking. The Report provides a critical summary of human trafficking as it exists around the world today.

Consistent with previous years, New Zealand has again been awarded a status of Tier 1 – the best possible result for the New Zealand government. This grade implies that New Zealand has appropriate legislation in place for dealing with what the US terms “minimum standards for the elimination of trafficking.”

This does not mean that the New Zealand government can rest on its laurels. The report urges the government to increase efforts to investigate and prosecute perpetrators of human trafficking, especially in relation to the trafficking of fishermen for forced labour in New Zealand’s fishing industry.

The continued existence of this form of human trafficking places New Zealand in the company of countries such as Thailand and other South-East Asian countries, where foreign fishermen are subjected to forced labour on board fishing vessels. Similar practices also occur in the wider South Pacific region, for example in Fiji; the Caribbean, in Jamaica and Trinidad and Tobago, and in Africa, in Mauritius, South Africa and Senegal.

It is clear that trafficking for the purpose of exploitation of labour is a widespread phenomenon. New Zealand is not unique in its experience with trafficking for forced labour. While New Zealand has legislation that meets the “minimum requirements” it is clear from the lack of investigation and prosecution that the forms of trafficking existent in New Zealand are not falling subject to the legislation that is currently in place, and are also escaping investigation by the authorities.

Since 2011, Slave Free Seas (www.slavefreeseas.org) has worked to promote the rights of victims of trafficking for forced labour in New Zealand’s fishing industry. Slave Free Seas has developed leading-edge responses to this form of trafficking, utilising novel approaches to pre-existing laws and policy in order to push forward the rights of victims, regardless of the stance of the New Zealand government.

ends

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Parliament Headlines | Politics Headlines | Regional Headlines

 

Sugar: Auckland Leisure Centres Axe Unhealthy Drinks

Auckland Council is to stop selling drinks that are sweetened by sugar from vending machines at its leisure centres in a bid to try to reduce obesity and type 2 diabetes... More>>

ALSO:

Gordon Campbell: On Todd McClay’s Faulty Memory

Time and again, whenever an issue arises the initial response by government is to deny or diminish the problem – nothing to worry about here, everything’s OK, move on. Then, hang on. In line with the usual pattern, as embarrassing details emerged into daylight, the story changed. More>>

ALSO:

Labour's 'Future Of Work': Major Reform Of Careers And Apprenticeships

The next Labour Government will transform careers advice in high schools to ensure every student has a personalised career plan, Leader of the Opposition Andrew Little says. More>>

ALSO:

State Investments Management: Treasury Likes IRD, Not Education Or Corrections

The Inland Revenue Department has scored an 'A' in the first tranche of the Treasury's investor confidence rating for state agencies that manage significant Crown investments and assets, gaining greater autonomy as a result, while the Corrections and Education ministries gained a 'C' rating. More>>

ALSO:

Govt Goal: NZ To Be "Predator Free" By 2050

Prime Minister John Key has today announced the Government has adopted the goal of New Zealand becoming Predator Free by 2050... “That’s why we have adopted this goal. Our ambition is that by 2050 every single part of New Zealand will be completely free of rats, stoats and possums." More>>

ALSO:

Gordon Campbell: On The IOC’s Treatment Of Russian Sport, And Lone Wolf Terrorism

A blanket ban on Russian athletes would also have exposed the IOC to criticism that its treatment of Russia would have been marked contrast to its treatment say, of the track and field team from Kenya – a country about which the IOC has very similar doping concerns. More>>

ALSO:

Get More From Scoop

 

LATEST HEADLINES

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Politics
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news