Gordon Campbell | Parliament TV | Parliament Today | News Video | Crime | Employers | Housing | Immigration | Legal | Local Govt. | Maori | Welfare | Unions | Youth | Search

 


The Letter - All changed, all the same

The Letter - All changed, all the same


We agree with John Key. The collapse in Labour’s support makes the government vulnerable. There are right/centre voters who think National is so left-wing that they won’t vote if they think National is going to win easily. Staying at home could elect a real "fruit cake" government. The combination of many parties and voluntary voting has resulted in extraordinary governments being elected in Europe, governments no pollster predicted. What this election has needed is a positive reason to vote and last Saturday Jamie Whyte delivered just such a speech at the ACT Northern Regional conference.

Jamie Whyte’s analysis of National

“The National Party in opposition claims to believe in personal responsibility, individual choice and fiscal discipline, in government they turn into the Labour Party. From the policies pursued over the last 5 years, you would think that Helen Clark’s Labour Party was still in power. Labour increased government spending dramatically. This National government has sustained it….Labour employed tens of thousands of new bureaucrats. National has kept most of them in their jobs. Bill English has actually boasted that under National high-earners pay a greater share of total taxation than they did under Labour’s tax policies.”
This week David Cunliffe and John Key both announced their parties tax policies. Labour will increase income tax on “high income” earners and John Key says there will only be tax cuts for middle and low income earners. Both tax policies are based on the belief that the purpose of tax is to redistribute income. They just disagree about the starting point. Neither leader thinks that tax should be set at the level that most encourages enterprise, growth or jobs. Neither thinks your money is your own and no government has the right to take a single dollar more than is needed to fund essential state services. This is the Clark/Key regime.

ACT under Jamie Whyte

"ACT is the only party in New Zealand that truly believes in free markets. The only party that believes in property rights. The only party that believes in individual liberty and personal responsibility. The only party that believes in a small state and a big individual."

It is a powerful message

ACT’s polling reveals around 17 percent of the electorate are right/Centre voters. 83% of New Zealanders are lefties who want the state to take the big decisions in their life for them. Jamie Whyte did not say National did not have its reasons for governing as if Helen Clark was still PM. But the 17 percent who voted five years ago for a change of government feel cheated. Up to half of the 17 percent have voted ACT and last election at least 3 percent of the right/centre voters stayed at home. That is the audience Jamie Whyte is aiming for - the voters who really believe in free enterprise and personal responsibility. They are the intelligent voters who realise that on all the big issues the National government will not lead - from the sustainability of super, falling educational standards, the decline in productivity in our hospitals to the stifling levels of tax and red tape. These voters like Jamie Whyte. They were waiting to hear Saturday’s speech.
Due to the media blackout few heard it but by 20 September they will.

The importance of education

“Education has become more important than ever. All around the world, the incomes of the well-educated are rising rapidly while the incomes of uneducated people are stagnating.
What matters now are your intellectual and social abilities, both of which can be greatly improved by a good education.”

What is wrong with New Zealand education?

"The difference between our best students and our worst is the biggest in the OECD. Our average is average only because our best are very good. Our underperforming students are doing really badly. About 15% leave school almost illiterate.” The Letter would add not only are the uneducated unemployable as the disturbing levels of youth unemployment signifies but our uneducated young adults are unable to do any task involving literacy. The country has a growing problem of unlicensed drivers who cannot pass the new driver’s license. We need to improve education standards or soon or later we are all going to be literally met them in a crash."

Why are so many schools failing?

If a state school fails to provide educations that satisfy the parents of their pupils, it will not shut down…it is likely to attract extra government funding. In the private sector, resources flow into success; in the public sector they flow into failure.
When market competition is replaced with state supplied goods and services, consumers’ preferences do not determine what gets offered. We get a standardized, one-size-fits-all educational model.
And, as always with one-size-fits all models, state education in New Zealand now fits only a few children.
As a recent Economist Magazine survey showed, charter schools in America clearly outperform state schools.
In New Zealand, Nick Hyde’s Vanguard Academy and Alwyn Poole’s South Auckland Middle School, for examples, are showing what committed and creative principals can do to lift standards.

ACT’s education policy for 2014

“With Partnership Schools, we have already made a step in the right direction.
Most importantly, their funding depends on how many students they attract. Their fortunes depend on the decisions of their pupils’ parents.
The answer is to give all state schools the option of become partnership schools. School boards should be allowed to opt out of control by the Ministry of Education, and be bulk-funded according to the number of students they can attract.
This policy entails no additional government spending.
Just more freedom for teachers to adapt their methods to their students.
More freedom for schools to innovate.
More choice for parents and students.”

ACT has the best leader

“When I took over the leadership of ACT, some commentators portrayed me as a new captain on the Titanic after it had been holed by an iceberg. ACT is not a ship. It is a torch for an idea. I am proud to have picked up that torch. For the idea is the most powerful idea, the most beautiful idea in the history of human affairs. It is the idea of freedom.”
The full speech which is the best given by any politician this year is on www.act.org.nz

ends

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Parliament Headlines | Politics Headlines | Regional Headlines

Parliament Today: State Opening Of Parliament

The House sits at 10.30am today before MPs are summoned to hear the Speech from the Throne in the Legislative Council Chamber.

The speech delivered by the Governor-General on the Government’s behalf outlines its priorities for this Parliament.

After this MPs will return to the House for the presentation of petitions and papers and the introduction of any bills.

The Government has five notices of motion on the Order Paper which can be debated. These relate to relating to the appointment of the Deputy Speaker, Assistant Speakers, the reinstatement of business in a carryover motion and one on “Entities to be deemed public organisations”. More>>

 

Tertiary Education: Students Doing It Tough As Fees Rise Again

The Government is making it increasingly difficult for Kiwis to gain tertiary education as fees continue to rise and access to student support becomes even more restricted, Labour’s Tertiary Education spokesperson Chris Hipkins says. More>>

ALSO:

Housing, Iraq: PM Press Conference – 20 October 2014

Prime Minister John Key met with press today to discuss:
• Housing prices and redevelopment in Auckland
• Discussions with Tony Abbott on the governmental response to ISIS, and New Zealand’s election to the UN Security Council More>>

ALSO:

Labour: Review Team Named, Leadership Campaign Starts

Labour’s New Zealand Council has appointed Bryan Gould as Convenor of its post-General Election Review. He will be joined on the Review Team by Hon Margaret Wilson, Stacey Morrison and Brian Corban.

ALSO:


Roy Morgan Poll: National Slips, Labour Hits Lows

The first New Zealand Roy Morgan Poll since the NZ Election shows National 43.5% (down 3.54% since the September 20 Election). This isn’t unusual, National support has dropped after each of John Key’s Election victories... However, support for the main opposition Labour Party has crashed to 22.5% (down 2.63% and the lowest support for Labour since the 1914 NZ Election as United Labour). More>>

ALSO:

In On First Round: New Zealand Wins Security Council Seat

Prime Minister John Key has welcomed New Zealand securing a place on the United Nations Security Council for the 2015-16 term. More>>

ALSO:

TPP Leak: Intellectual Property Text Confirms Risk - Jane Kelsey

The US is continuing its assault on generic medicines through numerous proposed changes to patent laws. ‘These are bound to impact on Pharmac if they are accepted’, according to Professor Kelsey... Copyright is another area of ongoing sensitivity... More>>

ALSO:

RMA: Smith Plans Reform To Ease Urban Development

Newly appointed Environment Minister Nick Smith has announced Resource Management Act reform to foster urban development, where high land prices and expensive resource consents are blocking efforts to provide affordable housing. More>>>

ALSO:

Gordon Campbell: On New Zealand getting involved (again) in other people's wars

Apparently, the Key government is still pondering how New Zealand will contribute to the fight against Islamic State. Long may it ponder, given the lack of consensus among our allies as to how to fight IS, where to fight it (Syria, Iraq, or both?) and with whose ground troops, pray tell? More>>

ALSO:

Gordon Campbell: On child poverty, and David Shearer’s latest outburst

The politicisation of (a) the public service and (b) the operations of the Official Information Act have been highlighted by the policy advice package on child poverty that RNZ’s resolute political editor Brent Edwards has finally prised out of the Ministry of Social Development. More>>

ALSO:

Gordon Campbell: On the government’s review of security laws

So the Key government is about to launch a four week review of the ability of our existing legislation to deal with “suspected and returning foreign terrorist fighters, and other violent extremists.”

According to its terms of reference, the review will consider whether the SIS, GCSB and Police are sufficiently able right now to (a) investigate and monitor suspected and returning foreign terrorist fighters… More>>

ALSO:

Get More From Scoop

 

LATEST HEADLINES

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Politics
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news