Gordon Campbell | Parliament TV | Parliament Today | News Video | Crime | Employers | Housing | Immigration | Legal | Local Govt. | Maori | Welfare | Unions | Youth | Search

 


Seafood Industry Strongly Opposed to CRP Mining Application

Seafood Industry Strongly Opposed to CRP Mining Application for Chatham Rise

The seafood industry strongly opposes Chatham Rock Phosphate’s application to mine the Chatham Rise, saying it will have “significant and irreversible adverse effects on the marine environment.”

In its submission to the Environmental Protection Authority (EPA) the Deepwater Group says the environmental impacts of mining will include massive disruption to the seafloor and the destruction of benthic fauna, including protected corals.

“The Chatham Rise is home to New Zealand’s most productive and abundant deepwater fisheries and is recognised as a ‘hotspot’ habitat for juvenile fish, including hoki, ling, silver warehou and white warehou,” says George Clement, Chief Executive of the Deepwater Group.

“Mining threatens to destroy the very ecosystem that supports these valuable fisheries and has the potential to harm fisheries well beyond the Chatham Rise.”

“Almost all of our juvenile hoki live on the Chatham Rise. When they mature, they move on to other feeding and breeding grounds around New Zealand. If the nursery environment for these young fish is damaged by mining, there will be fewer hoki and catches will be reduced across the entire New Zealand zone,” George Clement says.

The submission outlines the downstream effects of mining, including changes to water quality as a result of the release of trace metals and other contaminants from the large scale strip mining.

“These factors, combined with widespread habitat destruction, will put the health and quality of our sustainable fisheries at risk.”

Mr Clement says few New Zealanders are aware of just how vast the area under claim for mining is – 10,192 square kilometres.

“That’s equivalent to all of the land area between Whangarei and Thames, or all of the North Island south of Foxton. Most of this sea area has never been impacted by human activities.”

“People in Auckland and Wellington wouldn’t want strip mining in the space where they live, and we don’t want it in the nation’s CBD for seafood production,” he says.

“New Zealand is internationally recognised as being a leading producer of sustainable, high quality seafood. Why would we put all of this at risk?”

“The miners claim that New Zealand will benefit by $900 million over the next 15 years. This is a one-off gain and one that will leave the seabed turned upside down. During this period, seafood from the Chatham Rise will earn New Zealand more than $2,500 million, and this revenue continues to be earned and doesn’t just stop after 15 years.”

The seabed ecosystem on the central Chatham Rise has been protected as a Benthic Protected Area (BPA) since 2007 to preserve the unspoilt natural habitats and biodiversity by making it illegal to bottom trawl or dredge the area.

Mr Clement says most of this sea bottom will be dug up during the phosphate mining, with all excavated sea life destroyed and the tailings dispersed over wide areas smothering remaining corals and sponges.

Mr Clement says these large protected areas have the additional benefit of validating the sustainable ecosystems upon which New Zealand’s deepwater fisheries are based. He says hoki, hake and ling from the Chatham Rise all meet the international Marine Stewardship Council (MSC) Certification standards, the highest environmental standard for seafood production in the world.

“Mining this area is fundamentally incompatible with the protection provided through the BPA and the significant benefits delivered in having these marine protected areas.”

“The seafood industry has sustainably fished this area for more than 40 years; the ecosystems remain healthy and productive, and seafood continues to deliver significant economic benefits to New Zealand over this time and will into the future,” he says.

“We consider the economic benefits of the mining proposal, if any, are uncertain and are short term, compared with the demonstrated and ongoing stream of economic benefits from fishing.”

“While we will still be here in 150 years, the miners will be gone in 15, leaving us with all of their mess,” says Mr Clement.

Other areas of concern highlighted in the Deepwater Group’s submission include:

• A lack of basic information from CRP about the proposed mining approach and a high level of uncertainty around the potential impacts on the fisheries and habitat.
• That it is not an efficient use or development of natural resources
• That it will interfere with the successful management regimes, including the Quota Management System (QMS) and the protection of biodiversity through the BPA network
• That it does not include any conditions that are able to adequately reduce the level of uncertainty, or avoid, remedy or mitigate, the adverse effects of the proposal.
For the full submission link :

http://www.deepwater.co.nz/release-dwg-opposes-chatham-rock-phosphate-mining-application/

ENDS

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Parliament Headlines | Politics Headlines | Regional Headlines

 

Interim Report: Waitangi Tribunal On Ture Whenua Legislation

Labour on Proposed changes to Maori land rules: “To have Treaty Negotiations Minister Chris Finlayson dismiss findings as ‘bizarre’ is totally disingenuous and disrespectful. What’s bizarre is Maori Development Minister Te Ururoa Flavell stubbornly pushing through this Bill before the Waitangi Tribunal has even completed its report..." More>>

ALSO:

Spy Update: Appointment Of GCSB Acting Director

GCSB Chief Legal Advisor Lisa Fong will become the Acting Director of the Government Communications Security Bureau (GCSB) from 15 February 2016, Minister Responsible for the GCSB Christopher Finlayson announced today. More>>

Protests Close Roads: TPP Signed In Auckland

“TPP was signed by Australia, Brunei Darussalam, Canada, Chile, Japan, Malaysia, Mexico, New Zealand, Peru, Singapore, the United States and Viet Nam.” More>>

ALSO:

Emails Behind 'Diplomatic Immunity' Case: Whitehead Report Released

“As previously indicated the conclusions reached by Mr Whitehead’s investigation are not unexpected but they are very disappointing,” Mr Mccully says. “At the heart of the matter is a single email, along with procedural shortcomings, which gave Malaysian officials the impression it would be acceptable for Mr Rizalman to return to Malaysia." More>>

ALSO:

Gordon Campbell: On The Treaty/TPP Overlap, And Iowa

The fears about the ISDS provisions in the Trans Pacific Partnership deal are well-founded. The reality is that there is a sharp uptick in the occurrence of ISDS litigation in developed countries, and even the right wing likes of The Economist have been souring on the process for some time. More>>

ALSO:

Christchurch Red Zone Offers: Fresh High Court Proceedings

Grant Cameron, Solicitor for the Quake Outcasts said “the action seeks judicial review of the Crown’s recent decision to make a fresh offer to purchase properties from uninsured property owners in red zones. More>>

ALSO:

PM's Post-Cabinet Press Conference: Waitangi And TPP

Prime Minister John Key on Tuesday said his office has received an invitation for him to visit the Lower Marae on Waitangi Day, but was waiting for a meeting of the Te Tii Marae Trustees. More>>

ALSO:

Flagged: 'Wrong Colour' Bridge Flag To Change

NZ First: Only 13 days after National trumpeted its legally questionable flag on Auckland Harbour Bridge, it is now coming down because it is the wrong colour... “Mr Key’s latest flag fiasco is another waste of taxpayers' money. Given it is coming down, down is exactly the location where it should remain. More>>

ALSO:

School's In: Children Head Back To School

“Across the whole of this year we expect 61,820 five year olds will begin their primary schooling for the first time,” says the Ministry of Education head of sector enablement and support Katrina Casey. More>>

ALSO:

Dog & Lemon: FBI Disagrees With NZ Government Over Police Chases

Multiple studies, quoted by the FBI, show that once suspects realise they're no longer being chased; they tend to slow down to normal driving speeds and therefore become far less of a risk. The FBI report also categorically rejected the argument that abandoning police chases meant ‘giving in’ to offenders. More>>

ALSO:

Get More From Scoop

 

LATEST HEADLINES

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Politics
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news