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Interview with Metiria Turei

Interview with Metiria Turei

1. What are the achievements of the Green - Labour coalition?

We believe that the Green Party and Labour can work together. After the election, we will look at our shared goals and where we can work together to achieve positive goals for New Zealand.

For example we have similar views on strengthening our public education system, making sure every family has a warm, dry home and ending child poverty.

2. Union donations to Green party and Labour, does it signify bias on unions?

Not at all. We get donations from many different parts of society and many interest groups donate to a wide range across the political spectrum. For the Green Party, donations will not mean a bias.

3. Should Murray McCully resign following the Malaysian saga?

As the Minister responsible for MAFT, it is abundantly clear that he paid no regard to the issue within his ministry or to the wishes of the victim. This was a serious issue and one that he should have been on top of. It was a clear dereliction of duty on the part of Murray McCully and he should step up and take responsibility for it rather than passing the buck on to his staff.

The Prime Minster has also been remiss in not demanding action and preempting calls of resignation on MFAT staff when he really should be asking Murray McCully the hard questions.

4. How do they view the Internet-Mana coalition? Is there a possibility of Internet-Mana coalition chipping in the traditional vote bank of Labour - Green?

We are in a democracy where everyone is entitled to their opinion and to take part how they wish, including forming coalitions. We know we present the best possible option for all New Zealanders and that is why we will be campaigning for the Party Vote at this election.

5. Is the Greens turning New Zealand into a nanny state, with too much interference and governance in society?

No we are not. We recognize that there is a huge inequality in society – the inequality has grown under National over the last 6 years. What we are proposing is to reduce this inequality and make New Zealand a fair society again.

6. What's Green position on free market and business? What message do Greens want to send to the business community?

We believe that innovative and sustainable business is the best way forward for New Zealand. We, as a country, need to invest in industries that are going to create more jobs for us and our children and not continue to pour money into dying industries. This is why the Green Party has always been in favour of research and development.

In terms of the business community, we do support them. Under our Climate Protection Plan, the climate tax cut will mean businesses will benefit from a 1% company tax cut.

7. How do Greens want to tackle rising crimes? Is it a policing or socio-economic problem? How do Greens want to soothe the nerves of the victims of these crimes? What are the immediate steps to be taken to address the situation?

We believe that crime has its root causes in socio-economic issues. We believe we need to prevent crime, not just build prisons like National has done.

We will also focus on helping victims and ensuring they are supported throughout the ordeal. Many support services have faced closure over the last few years because of the lack of funding and the Green Party will ensure that there are adequate services to help victims.

We also believe there needs to be a look into the judicial system so there is a focus on reducing repeat offenders. A speedy justice system is needed for both perpetrators and victims.

8. Is there any message for the Indian and Fijian Indian community?

The Green Party embraces a multicultural New Zealand. Many New Zealanders have come to New Zealand for a brighter future for themselves and their children. We want to deliver that by providing a fairer society, a cleaner environment and a smarter economy.

ends

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