Gordon Campbell | Parliament TV | Parliament Today | News Video | Crime | Employers | Housing | Immigration | Legal | Local Govt. | Maori | Welfare | Unions | Youth | Search

 


Mangere College students take stance on family violence

23 July, 2014

Mangere College students first to take stance on family violence

The students of south Auckland high school, Mangere College, became the first in the country today to implement the ‘It’s not OK’ campaign throughout the school in an effort to help prevent family violence occurring in its local community.

Joining the campaign was the brainchild of the students at Mangere College and includes a number of student-lead initiatives which ensure fellow students are supported within the school to help prevent family violence they may be experiencing at home.

Initiatives include student volunteers who have become champions that their fellow students can approach for confidential advice on how and where to seek support for family violence matters. Elements of the ‘It’s not OK’ campaign have also been embedded in the school curriculum and a student-designed billboard which depicts the school’s stance against family violence is being unveiled today at a launch event at the school.

Mangere College student champion, Desaray Williams, says that joining the It’s not OK campaign and implementing the measures across the school is a public statement and commitment by students against family violence in their community.

“We were shocked by the rates of family violence in New Zealand,” says Desaray.

“We want to make a difference in our community and spread awareness of how others can be part of the solution to this issue, which affects every community.

“We challenge other schools to join the campaign and create communities that are free from family violence,” says Desaray.

The senior students of Mangere College were inspired to join the ‘It’s not OK’ campaign during a school camp where Family Works Family Violence Prevention Advocate and ‘It’s not OK’ ambassador, Jude Simpson, gave a presentation to the students about the impact of family violence in our communities.

Mangere College Principal, John Heyes, says that Jude’s presentation had a profound effect on the students.

“The students listening to Jude’s presentation that day were so moved that they felt compelled to act and I am extremely proud of the way they have worked to make this relationship with the campaign happen,” says Mr Heyes.

“Becoming an ‘It’s not OK’ school builds on the great work Mangere College has already been doing in supporting students to act with respect and responsibility whilst at school, and this campaign allows these values to reach out beyond the school gate,” says Mr Heyes.

Family Works Family Violence Prevention Advocate and a former victim of child abuse, Jude Simpson, says she is thrilled Mangere College students have led the way in becoming the first school to implement such extensive measures.

“By Mangere College students taking the lead on this it sends a very clear message that family violence, in any community, is not OK,” says Jude.

Deputy Chief Executive Officer for the Ministry of Social Development’s Family and Community Services, Murray Edridge, says the ministry is proud to be partnering with Mangere College via the ‘It’s not OK’ campaign.

“Young people can influence their peers, their families and their communities and it’s through this initiative Mangere College is helping to create future families that say violence is not OK,” says Murray.

The launch event today at Mangere College brought together all the supporting agencies including ‘It’s not OK’ campaign, the NZ Police and Family Works – an organisation providing social services to victims of family violence.

Christopher Barry, Senior Sergeant for Counties Manukau Police, said family violence happens in every community and it’s initiatives like Mangere College students signing up to the ‘It’s not OK’ campaign which help to give a serious social problem visibility.

“We know a lot of family violence is not reported to the police or social services and we want young people and their families to know where to turn for help,” says Christopher.

“Family violence is an issue that must be taken seriously.”

About It’s not OK campaign
The It’s not OK campaign is a nationwide initiative which is driven by local communities to reduce family violence in New Zealand. It aims to changes attitudes and behaviour that tolerate any kind of family violence.

About Family Works
Family Works is part of Presbyterian Support Northern, with services which annually support more than 15,000 at-risk children and their families to help them address complex issues like violence and conflict.

Family Works is part of Presbyterian Support Northern, an independent, charitable social service organisation that supports vulnerable people and enhances local communities.

ENDS

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Parliament Headlines | Politics Headlines | Regional Headlines

'Tea Break Bill' Passes: Gordon Campbell On Bad Labour Laws And Poor Safety

By co-incidence, one of the prime dangers of the government’s new employment relations law has been underlined by the release of the death and injury statistics among workers at New Zealand ports. These are highly profitable enterprises for the port owners.

The Port of Tauranga for instance, is expecting its current full-year profit to be between $78 million and $83 million and other ports are enjoying similar boom times – but they are also highly dangerous places for the people who work on or around the port premises. At the Port of Tauranga, there have been 26 serious accidents since 2011, and two deaths. More>>

 

Parliament Today:

No Charges: Outcome Of Operation Clover Investigation

Police have completed a multi-agency investigation, Operation Clover, into the activities of a group calling themselves “The Roast Busters”. The 12 month enquiry focused on incidents involving allegations of sexual offending against a number of girls in the Waitemata Police district and wider Auckland area... More>>

ALSO:

UNICEF Report: NZ Cautioned On "Stagnating" Child Poverty

An international report by UNICEF has found that child poverty rates in New Zealand have barely changed since 2008, despite similar sized countries significantly reducing child poverty during the recent recession. More>>

ALSO:

Funding Report: Two Pathways For Transport In Auckland

Commissioned by Auckland Council, the group was asked to investigate two possible pathways for raising $300 million per year ($12 billion over 30 years) to pay for the improvements needed to help fix Auckland’s transport system. More>>

ALSO:

Pay Equity: Equal Pay Win In Court Of Appeal

CTU: The Court of Appeal has made a historic decision paving the way for a substantial equal pay claim for aged care workers. More>>

ALSO:

Gordon Campbell: On The TPP Finishing Line, And Amazon’s Woes

If the Trans Pacific Partnership trade deal wasn’t such a serious matter, this would be pretty funny… More>>

ALSO:

TV3 Video: Three Die On Roads Over Labour Weekend

The official holiday period ended at 6am Tuesday, with three deaths on the roads during the Labour Day weekend. More>>

Employment Relations Bill: Govt Strains To Get Tea Break Law Through

The Government has been left with egg on its face - failing to get its much-vaunted, but hugely unpopular, meal break law passed in the first week of its new term, Labour spokesperson on Labour Issues Andrew Little says. More>>

ALSO:

Guns: Police Association Call To Arm Police Full Time

"The new minister gave his view, that Police do not need to be armed, while standing on the forecourt of parliament. The dark irony was that the interview followed immediately after breaking news of a gunman running amok in the Canadian parliament in Ottawa..." More>>

ALSO:

Get More From Scoop

 

LATEST HEADLINES

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Politics
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news