Gordon Campbell | Parliament TV | Parliament Today | News Video | Crime | Employers | Housing | Immigration | Legal | Local Govt. | Maori | Welfare | Unions | Youth | Search

 

Kellogg issues climate change wake-up call

Kellogg issues climate change wake-up call


Kellogg, the maker of staple Kiwi breakfasts Coco Pops, Cornflakes and Sultana Bran today became the second global food giant to say it will take industry-leading steps to cut pollution across its operations.

Oxfam welcomes the announcement which comes after more than 230,000 people, including thousands of Kiwis, signed petitions and took action as part of a global campaign to urge food and drink companies to help stop climate change.

“We applaud Kellogg for taking this vital first step,” said Rachael Le Mesurier, Oxfam New Zealand’s Executive Director. “It couldn’t come sooner. This work needs to happen now, before the damage caused by pollution is irreversible. Everything is at stake: the food we eat, the air we breathe, the water we drink - and the world we leave for our children.”

General Mills, owner of Old El Paso tacos and Haagan Daz ice cream announced similar plans on July 28.

“The hard truth is that climate change is putting hundreds of millions of people at risk of hunger and threatening everything from coffee and cereal to wine and chocolate,” said Le Mesurier. “Kellogg is joining a growing list of companies that are putting the weight of their brands behind climate action.”

Kellogg will also sign-on to the Climate Declaration and join the Business for Innovative Climate and Energy Policy, a leading advocacy coalition of businesses committed to working with policy makers to pass meaningful climate and energy legislation.

“Kellogg’s new commitments add momentum to calls on governments, and the wider food and agriculture industry, to recognise that climate change is real, it’s happening now, and we need to tackle it,” said Le Mesurier. “We look forward to tracking the actions the company takes to follow through on their promises.”

Oxfam’s Standing on the Sidelines report revealed that the 10 biggest food and beverage companies together emit so much pollution that, if they were a single country, they would be the 25th most polluting in the world. By pursuing industry-leading measures to cut pollution from its operations, General Mills and Kellogg are showing that much more can be done by everyone in the industry to reduce climate pollution.

“This is a huge win for consumers, and it’s testament to the power we all have to challenge the status quo and inspire big business to change. There is no longer a question of whether consumer action can produce results. The real question is whether the wider industry and our political leaders will get ahead of the wave or wait to be crushed by it,” said Le Mesurier.

Kellogg’s new climate policy comes alongside other promising new sustainability commitments released today. Oxfam welcomes Kellogg’s climate action commitment including its promises to:

1. Define and disclose a total supply chain pollution reduction target by December 2015, including agriculture emissions reductions. The targets will use a science-based methodology approved and endorsed by industry and other stakeholders to be consistent with the goal of keeping global temperature rise below 2 degrees Celsius.

2. Require key suppliers to measure and publically disclose their emissions and reduction targets.

3. Establish a climate change adaptation strategy that incorporates the needs of smallholders in our supply chain by December 2015.

4. Expand zero net deforestation pledge to high-risk supply chains by 2020. This expands its previous commitments for palm oil and packaging fiber to include other supply chains at high risk for deforestation and land degradation including soy and sugarcane.

5. Disclose top three suppliers of palm oil, soy, and sugar cane, key drivers of deforestation and land use change.

6. Publicly advocate for effective and efficient public and industry association policy, such as encouraging the Grocery Manufacturer’s Association to make climate change a priority.

7. Regularly review company statements and policies to ensure they are aligned with reduction targets, plans, and adaptation initiatives.

8. Address issues raised by Oxfam and its partners about its palm oil suppliers in Indonesia and Liberia.

The company’s full commitments can be seen at: http://www.kelloggcompany.com/content/dam/kelloggcompanyus/corporate_responsibility/pdf/2014/Climate_Policy.pdf

//ENDS

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
Parliament Headlines | Politics Headlines | Regional Headlines

Rebuilding: Silvia Cartwright To Lead Inquiry Into EQC

“The inquiry will be the first of its kind under the Public Inquiries Act 2013 and will have all the powers of a Royal Commission, be independent of Government and make its report directly to the Governor-General.

“The aim of the inquiry is to learn from the experience of the Canterbury earthquakes and ensure that the Earthquake Commission is fit for purpose in future events.

“The insurance system as a whole, including EQC’s role in that system, needs to be ready to deliver services to those affected by the next big event – whenever or wherever that happens." More>>

 

Gordon Campbell: On The Royal Commission Into Child Abuse

Obviously, it is good news that the coalition government has broadened the scope of its Royal Commission into the abuse of children, beyond its previous focus on children in state care. More>>

ALSO:

Cases Delayed: Court Staff Refuse To Handle Sentencing Papers

Dozens of court cases have reportedly been delayed, as court staff escalate industrial action at two Auckland courts by enforcing a ban on handling sentencing papers. More>>

ALSO:

Education: Primary Teachers Rolling Strikes

RNZ Report: More than 100,000 primary school students in Auckland will be home from school today as teachers and principals walk off the job for the second time this year. It's the start of a week of rolling one-day strikes around the country, after the collapse of contract negotiations last Thursday. More>>

ALSO:

"Process Was Sound": Inquiry Into Haumaha Appointment Released

The Inquiry’s purpose was to examine, identify, and report on the adequacy of the process that led to the appointment. It found the process was sound and no available relevant information was omitted. More>>

ALSO:

Govt Loses In Supreme Court: Call For Debate On Prisoners' Right To Vote

The court earlier this week upheld a High Court decision which found that a law restricting a prisoner's right to vote was inconsistent with the Bill of Rights. More>>

ALSO:

Shenanigans: NZ First Accepts Jami-Lee Ross Proxy Vote

The New Zealand First caucus strongly believes that in terms of the Electoral Integrity Amendment Act, that someone in Mr Ross’ position should resign his seat... the New Zealand First Whip will use Mr Ross’ proxy–to be exercised at all times in support of the vote of the National Party... More>>

ALSO:

Call For Conversation: Do You Know What Data Is Being Collected About You?

New Zealand Maori Council has called on a national conversation when it comes to data sovereignty asking the question “just how many people know what data is being collected, why and how is it being used?” More>>

 
 
 
 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

  • PARLIAMENT
  • POLITICS
  • REGIONAL
 
 

InfoPages News Channels