Gordon Campbell | Parliament TV | Parliament Today | News Video | Crime | Employers | Housing | Immigration | Legal | Local Govt. | Maori | Welfare | Unions | Youth | Search

 

Walking and the Election

Walking and the Election


The Green Party has topped the polls while National has failed to register according to NZ's pedestrian advocacy organisation Living Streets Aotearoa (LSA).


LSA recently asked each party represented in the current Parliament 7 questions to find out which parties would do things to make life better for pedestrians.


Andy Smith, President of LSA, says the responses were quite revealing with the Green Party clearly out in front while the Maori Party also showed a strong commitment to making walking more convenient, appealing and safer.


Mana was also strong and would have scored more strongly had it had some original ideas for actions to benefit walkers.


Labour seemed to be speaking the right language but was a bit too non-committal, using lots of phrases like 'We'll investigate/review...'.


In contrast, NZ First was definitive but brief in its answers offering no elaboration.


United Future came in next, suffering from too many weasel words and wanting to leave too much up to local authorities, which is the partly the current cause of poor provision for pedestrians and why the standard is so variable around the country.


ACT came in very lowly, saying everything would be according to the market - supply and demand - which really told us nothing.


But at the bottom of the heap was National which declined to even answer our questions.


Andy Smith stressed that even though only 7% of people who left home to go to work on census day used walking as their main mode of transport, many times more would have done so to get to their ferry, train or bus or to or from their motor vehicle. Additionally, large numbers of school children walk to and from school and during the day many other


people walk for all sorts of purposes from shopping to exercise. So nearly everyone who leaves home each day is a pedestrian at some stage on their daily journeys and politicians should allocate adequate resources and implement appropriate laws to make this mode safe, convenient and appealing. Besides all its health and environmental benefits, it would bring added vitality and economic activity to our towns and cities.


Living Streets applauds the recent financial commitments being made to cycling in New Zealand but points out that far more people walk each day than cycle and that resources should be allocated to ensure both these sustainable, active modes are made easy.


See the questions and the parties' responses on our election page


http://www.livingstreets.org.nz/node/4880


ends

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
Parliament Headlines | Politics Headlines | Regional Headlines

Spying On Politicians, Activists, Iwi, Quake Victims: "Failings Across Public Service"

A State Services Commission investigation into the use of external security consultants by government agencies has uncovered failings across the public service, including breaches of the code of conduct...

However, the inquiry found no evidence of widespread inappropriate surveillance by external security consultants on behalf of government agencies. More>>

 

Children's Commissioner: Child Poverty Law "Historic Cause For Celebration"

...It represents a cross-party commitment to a fundamental shift of policy for our most disadvantaged children and should help undo 30 years of damage to children from our most vulnerable families. More>>

ALSO:

Dope News: Binding Cannabis Referendum To Be Held At 2020 Election

The referendum on cannabis for personal use is part of Labour's confidence and supply agreement with the Greens. It could be one of potentially three referenda - decisions have yet to be made about euthanasia and changes to electoral laws. More>>

ALSO:

Vic: Victoria University Name Change Rejected

Education Minister Chris Hipkins has declined Victoria University of Wellington Council’s application for a legal name change. More>>

ALSO:

PM's Post-Cab 17/12/18: Chief Justice, M Bovis

Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern's final post-cabinet press conference of the year focussed on announcing the appointment of Helen Winkelmann as the next Chief Justice, and an update on effort to eradicate Mycoplasma bovis from New Zealand. More>>

ALSO:

Law Commission Issues Paper: Use Of DNA In Criminal Investigations

In the 22 years since the Act came into force, it has become clear that the modern-day fingerprint analogy is increasingly inapt... Theoretically, whole genome sequencing could ultimately become the standard method of analysing a DNA sample. Such a development will give a new perspective on the concept of genetic surveillance in the criminal context. More>>

State Highways: $1.4 Billion For Road Safety Improvements

The Safe Network Programme will make 870 kilometres of high volume, high-risk State Highways safer by 2021 with improvements like median and side barriers, rumble strips, and shoulder widening. More>>

ALSO:

Dealing Crackdown, Addiction Support: Government Action On Synthetics

The NZ Drug Foundation has welcomed the Government’s response to synthetic drug deaths. The response strikes a balance between giving law enforcement the tools they need to target criminal networks and changing drug law to make it easier for people to access help when they need it. More>>

ALSO:

 
 
 
 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

  • PARLIAMENT
  • POLITICS
  • REGIONAL
 
 

InfoPages News Channels