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One down, 12 to go says Community Housing Aotearoa

One down, 12 to go says Community Housing Aotearoa

The Waimahia Inlet is a step in the right direction for community housing to deliver 20% of New Zealand’s social and affordable housing by 2020, says Community Housing Aotearoa.

CHA Director Scott Figenshow says the sector has been set a big target of creating 15,000 affordable homes over the next six years, and the momentum needs to continue with a commitment of resources for a dozen more similar developments throughout the country.

“We’ve heard the call to the community housing sector to deliver 20% of New Zealand’s affordable and social housing, and this project delivers. It has delivered quality homes designed to the Homestar 6 standards at the right price with a range of rental and ownership options that families can truly afford.

“Now we are encouraging Government to commit the resources to help deliver a dozen more Waimahia Inlets around the Auckland region- and adjust the model to work across New Zealand.”

The Waimahia Inlet is housed on 16 vacant hectares on the Weymouth Penisular, offering a diverse range of 282 quality homes from two bedrooms through to five bedrooms. 40% of the homes will be sold on the open market, 60% will be available for assisted ownership and rental programmes .

Scott Figenshow says the Waimahia Inlet development is a true example of creating a mixed income, mixed tenure, well built and designed community.

“This kind of investment leverages the best traits for each of the four sectors involved – iwi, private sector, community housing and Government. The private sector contractors are doing the infrastructure and building homes, iwi and the community housing sector have brought the partnership together and manage the development ensuring it meets both initial needs and long term needs of the new community.

“And of course the Government is a key partner through confirming the sale of this former piece of publicly owned land and investing $29 million, which is the minimum required to make it happen.” Without this partnership it would have cost the government twice that if it delivered it itself.

He says the appeal of this partnership is that it provides a legal structure where smaller community organisations can participate alongside larger more established organisations.

“For example, Habitat for Humanity is able to build sweat equity homes on sections it is obtaining in Waimahia. The partnerships like this are a far more efficient and effective way for Government to invest.”

The Waimahia Inlet project was led by Tamaki Makaurau Community Housing, with a partnership between Nga Mana Whenua o Tamaki Makaurau – Tamaki Collective, New Zealand Housing Foundation, Auckland and Onehunga Hostels Endowment Trust and CORT Community Housing.

[ends]

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