Gordon Campbell | Parliament TV | Parliament Today | News Video | Crime | Employers | Housing | Immigration | Legal | Local Govt. | Maori | Welfare | Unions | Youth | Search

 


Making tertiary education more accessible to Māori

Making tertiary education more accessible to Māori


29 August 2014

The Māori Party launched its tertiary education policy today at Te Huinga Tauira o Te Mana Ākonga, the national hui for the Māori Teritary Students Association in Palmerston North.

Te Tai Hauāuru candidate Chris McKenzie says the Party’s focus is on encouraging more Māori to participate in tertiary education and lifting their expectations in the level of study they pursue.

“One of the initiatives we strongly support is the “First in Whānau” scholarship proposal which was designed and costed by the New Zealand University Students Association. It’s a fee free scholarship for the first person in a whānau to pursue a Bachelor level qualification. We know this can be a circuit breaker. Having one whānau member study at that level encourages others to do the same,” says Mr McKenzie.

The Party also wants to see the cap on level one to four programmes in Institutes of Technology and Polytechnics (ITPs) lifted to allow more foundation and trade training level programmes to be established.

“We’ve recently announced our ongoing commitment to the highly successful Māori and Pasifika Trade Training programmes. We want to double the placement numbers from 3000 to 6000. There’s clearly a big market for skilled tradespeople and apprentices,” says Mr McKenzie.

Mr McKenzie says trade training graduates are progressing on to jobs, apprenticeships or higher studies. “These are all great outcomes – having a higher education means a better living for graduates and their whānau.”

The Māori Party wants to ensure all students have better financial support during their tertiary studies. It supports a universal student allowance. It also wants to re-instate student allowances for post-graduate students that were scrapped in 2012.

“The student allowance is less than the unemployment benefit so we need to look at providing universal allowances to all full-time tertiary students as an investment in our future”, says Mr McKenzie.

“We’re also pleased to see that the Green Party are promoting part of our policy for free public transport to tertiary students, announced at our 10th birthday celebrations earlier this year. We think students should have round-the-clock rather than just off-peak free public transport. We’re happy to work with all the parties to progress this.”

This year Te Huinga Tauira o Te Mana Ākonga is being run by Manawatahi, Massey University’s Māori Student Association and hosted at Ratana Pā with events in Palmerston North.

“We’ll continue to support Māori student hui and any moves to have Māori students represented at all levels of the sector. There is still much more to be done to ensure Māori students have a strong voice and I plan to repeal the Education (Freedom of Association) Amendment Bill because it undermines the student voice,” says Mr McKenzie.


The full Tertiary Education Policy is online http://maoriparty.org/policies/tertiary-education/


ends

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Parliament Headlines | Politics Headlines | Regional Headlines

 

PARLIAMENT TODAY:

Gordon Campbell: On The Economic Bad News (And Turkey’s Fears About The Kurds)

Traditionally, voters regard National as a more competent manager of the economy. It is the sole upside of crony capitalism: surely these guys must know what their mates in business want and need. These last few months though, have put that faith sorely to the test... More>>

ALSO:

Discussion Document: Fresh Look At Family Violence Laws

A discussion document launched today takes a hard look at the way the law prevents and responds to family violence, and proposes a comprehensive rethink to strengthen New Zealand’s legislative response. More>>

ALSO:

PM's Presser: ‘Precarious’ Solid Energy In Banks’ Hands

Liquidation of state-owned coal company Solid Energy “cannot be ruled out” but is “not the number one preferred option of the government,” says Prime Minister John Key, who confirmed the beleaguered company was discussed today at Cabinet as its banking syndicate grapples with its commercially dire prospects. More>>

ALSO:

Missed Opportunities: Amnesty International Report Card On NZ's UN Role

As New Zealand steps down from its month as President of the Council, Amnesty International has taken the opportunity to review New Zealand’s role on the Council so far and assess their performance and contribution to protecting human rights worldwide. More>>

ALSO:

Prince Charles Get More Jobs: PM Announces Honorary Military Appointments

PM John Key has announced that Her Majesty The Queen has approved the appointment of HRH The Prince of Wales to three honorary positions: Admiral of the Fleet of the Royal New Zealand Navy; Field Marshal, New Zealand Army; Marshal of the Royal New Zealand Air Force. More>>

ALSO:

No TPP Deal: Gordon Campbell On Why We Should Still Oppose Investor-State Dispute Measures

Even in this dark hour for the TPP, the secrecy farce continues... What is left to hide? Every single negotiator went into those talks in Maui knowing exactly where everyone else stood. More>>

REACTION:

Get More From Scoop

 

LATEST HEADLINES

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Politics
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news