Gordon Campbell | Parliament TV | Parliament Today | News Video | Crime | Employers | Housing | Immigration | Legal | Local Govt. | Maori | Welfare | Unions | Youth | Search

 


Vega Auriga should be detained in NZ until problems fixed

Vega Auriga should be detained in New Zealand until problems fixed


Monday 1 September 2014

Maritime Union of New Zealand National Secretary Joe Fleetwood says that the ship Vega Auriga should be detained in a New Zealand port until it is deemed seaworthy and crew issues have been fixed.

The Liberian flagged Vega Auriga was a serial offender when it came to safety and seafarer welfare, and had been detained at Australian ports three times since July 2013 by Australian maritime authorities.

It had been described as "unseaworthy and substandard" by Australian Maritime Safety Authority manager Allan Schwartz, and had been banned from the Australian coast.

The banning had been supported by the Maritime Union of Australia and International Transport Workers’ Federation (ITF) who represent global seafarers.

The Vega Auriga is currently in the Port of Tauranga, where Maritime New Zealand (Government) inspectors had inspected the vessel and ordered repairs before it was allowed to leave port.

Mr Fleetwood says that a full investigation of the ship was required due to the seriousness of the actions taken by Australian authorities.

He says the Australian Maritime Safety Authority had the power to act more strongly as Australia was a signatory of the Maritime Labour Convention (MLC), an international agreement to protect the rights of seafarers.

The Maritime Union of New Zealand says the New Zealand Government has the Maritime Labour Convention under consideration, but the process needed to be accelerated.

“This incident shows the urgency of getting New Zealand up to speed as a signatory of the MLC."

Mr Fleetwood says that New Zealand has seen the Rena grounding, terrible incidents in the fishing industry, and the Pike River tragedy, and action was required.

“High standards are not an optional extra, they are a basic requirement.”

ENDS

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Parliament Headlines | Politics Headlines | Regional Headlines

 

PARLIAMENT TODAY:

Gordon Campbell: On The Economic Bad News (And Turkey’s Fears About The Kurds)

Traditionally, voters regard National as a more competent manager of the economy. It is the sole upside of crony capitalism: surely these guys must know what their mates in business want and need. These last few months though, have put that faith sorely to the test... More>>

ALSO:

Discussion Document: Fresh Look At Family Violence Laws

A discussion document launched today takes a hard look at the way the law prevents and responds to family violence, and proposes a comprehensive rethink to strengthen New Zealand’s legislative response. More>>

ALSO:

PM's Presser: ‘Precarious’ Solid Energy In Banks’ Hands

Liquidation of state-owned coal company Solid Energy “cannot be ruled out” but is “not the number one preferred option of the government,” says Prime Minister John Key, who confirmed the beleaguered company was discussed today at Cabinet as its banking syndicate grapples with its commercially dire prospects. More>>

ALSO:

Missed Opportunities: Amnesty International Report Card On NZ's UN Role

As New Zealand steps down from its month as President of the Council, Amnesty International has taken the opportunity to review New Zealand’s role on the Council so far and assess their performance and contribution to protecting human rights worldwide. More>>

ALSO:

Prince Charles Get More Jobs: PM Announces Honorary Military Appointments

PM John Key has announced that Her Majesty The Queen has approved the appointment of HRH The Prince of Wales to three honorary positions: Admiral of the Fleet of the Royal New Zealand Navy; Field Marshal, New Zealand Army; Marshal of the Royal New Zealand Air Force. More>>

ALSO:

No TPP Deal: Gordon Campbell On Why We Should Still Oppose Investor-State Dispute Measures

Even in this dark hour for the TPP, the secrecy farce continues... What is left to hide? Every single negotiator went into those talks in Maui knowing exactly where everyone else stood. More>>

REACTION:

Get More From Scoop

 

LATEST HEADLINES

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Politics
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news