Gordon Campbell | Parliament TV | Parliament Today | News Video | Crime | Employers | Housing | Immigration | Legal | Local Govt. | Maori | Welfare | Unions | Youth | Search

 


Students call for change, have the power to make it happen

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Students call for change – and have the power to make it happen.

03 September 2014

Press release: New Zealand Union of Students’ Associations

Early results from a survey of university and polytechnic students, involving nearly 5000 tertiary students, shows that if students vote for what they believe in they are likely to be extremely influential in the current election.

“Our Income and Expenditure Survey has a thirty year tradition and has confirmed students are very clear in what they support. The rules of our democracy are very simple, if the 400,000 tertiary students, which is 14% of eligible voters, vote for parties promising what students want then we will prompt change to get those things”, says Daniel Haines, New Zealand Union of Students’ Association (NZUSA) President.

Areas that the survey has highlighted are:

1. Funding and Allowances
Six out of 10 said they support free education, with just 1 in 20 strongly opposed. Six out of 10 said they were concerned at how much debt they would have when they graduated, only 1 in 6 did not. Only 8% of full-time students were not at all worried about their debt level on graduating. Three-quarters want a living allowance that is not dependent on parents’ income, against 1 in 20 who strongly oppose this.

2. Student Loan Scheme
Ninety-three percent support interest-free student loans, with just 2% strongly opposed – which reflects popular support for The ACT Party, the only party that advocates restoring interest, although the National-led government introduced a finance charge – interest by stealth – in 2012.

3. Student Voice
Eighty-five percent want restoration of a collective student voice that is independent, authentic and sustainably resourced, most likely achieved through an end to voluntary membership of students’ associations.

4. Tertiary Governance Arrangements
Eighty-seven percent agree or strongly agree that students should have a role in governance of their institutions, against just 1% who are opposed. This represents an overwhelming rejection of Steven Joyce’s proposed governance changes for universities and wānanga.

5. Scholarships for the first in family
NZUSA’s first-in-family policy – even though no current student would benefit from it and it has only recently been introduced as a concept – had 55% support, though understandably a quarter had no opinion. Just 9% were opposed.

6. Graduate Jobs
Eighty percent of respondents wanted all graduates to be entitled to high quality jobs, with restrictions on job specific programmes to the number of jobs available, if necessary, just 1% strongly disagreed.

NZUSA has produced a student guide to voting which can be found here: http://bit.ly/campaign2014

ENDS

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Parliament Headlines | Politics Headlines | Regional Headlines

 

PARLIAMENT TODAY:

Labour: New Figures Show Speculators Rampant

New figures released by the Reserve Bank show there’s been an explosion in mortgage lending with most of the growth going to property investors, Labour’s Housing spokesperson Phil Twyford says. More>>

ALSO:

False Official Information Response: English's Apology Accepted

Finance Minister Bill English is being thanked for his apology to New Zealand First Leader and Member of Parliament for Northland Rt Hon Winston Peters... Mr English says his staff and the Treasury have searched again, and they found the document that they denied having. More>>

ALSO:

Midwives On Pay Equity: Historic Bill Of Rights Case For High Court

“We have been left with no choice.” That from Karen Guilliland, the Chief Executive of the New Zealand College of Midwives, as the organisation prepares to file a pay parity discrimination case on the basis of gender under the NZ Bill of Rights Act in the High Court. More>>

ALSO:

Gordon Campbell: On The Children’s Commission Report On CYF

Accusing the overworked and underfunded staff at Child, Youth and Family of a “dump and run culture of neglect” is the kind of luxury that a Children’s Commissioner can afford to indulge in from his own comfy perch in the bureaucracy. More>>

ALSO:

Mt Eden Prison: Serco Inquiry Extended

A two month delay to the Government investigation into prison fight clubs shows the extent of problems within the Serco circus, says Labour’s Corrections spokesperson Kelvin Davis. More>>

ALSO:

Get More From Scoop

 

LATEST HEADLINES

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Politics
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news