Gordon Campbell | Parliament TV | Parliament Today | News Video | Crime | Employers | Housing | Immigration | Legal | Local Govt. | Maori | Welfare | Unions | Youth | Search

 

Pacific nations building resilience by protecting animals

Pacific nations building resilience by protecting animals and livelihoods during disasters


When disasters strike, the impact is devastating for animals and the communities that depend on them. With experts predicting more frequent severe weather events as the world’s climate changes, there is the potential for large numbers of animals to suffer and die as a result of natural disasters across the Pacific. Many millions of people rely on animals for livelihoods and sustenance, the loss of animals also has a long-term impact on the recovery of communities.

World Animal Protection is attending the UN Conference on Small Island Developing States (SIDS) in Apia, Samoa this week, highlighting the importance of protecting animals during disasters, which is also part of continuing work to ensure animals are included in the UN’s new Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). The goals and targets are currently under development and due to be implemented by all UN member states from 2016 to 2030.

Kiwi Dr Wayne Ricketts, a disaster management vet with World Animal Protection said: “We all have a responsibility to provide for the needs of animals, protecting them from pain and suffering. With better treatment of animals and integrating them in planning, we can prepare for disasters and address development issues such as poverty, food security, healthy oceans and sustainable livelihoods. To build a truly sustainable future we must take care of our animals and we can do this by including them in the Sustainable Development Goals.”

World Animal Protection has been working for over 50 years to help governments and communities respond to, and prepare for disasters, enabling people to protect animals and rebuild their lives. The only animal welfare organisation with a full-time global network of response teams, staff can be on the scene of a disaster within the first few critical days. In the Pacific, in recent years, teams have responded to help animals and communities following disasters in Samoa, Fiji, Vanuatu and the Solomon Islands.

World Animal Protection also helps governments prepare for future disasters and has delivered training for Pacific representatives on the Livestock Emergency Guidelines and Standards (LEGS) which includes simple early warning systems and coordinated evacuation of animals.

Dr Ricketts added: “We know Samoa and the Pacific region is very vulnerable to the continuing impacts of climate change and natural disasters, so it’s important to build awareness and help people take action to protect their animals before and during disasters. If you take care of animals, you are also taking care of communities. Protecting animals can reduce the need for long-term aid. If animals are saved, families can stay self-sufficient. People survive, recover and rebuild as quickly as possible.”

Ends


© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Parliament Headlines | Politics Headlines | Regional Headlines

Back Again: Government Approves TPP11 Mandate

The Government has approved a negotiating mandate for Trans-Pacific Partnership 11 (TPP11), which will ensure New Zealand businesses remain competitive in overseas markets.

Trade Minister Todd McClay says New Zealand will be pushing for the minimal number of changes possible to the original TPP agreement, something that the remaining TPP11 countries have agreed on. More>>

ALSO:

.

 
 

Gordon Campbell: On Why Labour Isn’t Responsible For Barnaby Joyce

As a desperate Turnbull government tries to treat the Barnaby Joyce affair as a Pauline Hanson fever dream – blame it on the foreigners! We’re the victims of the dastardly New Zealand Labour Party! – our own government has chosen to further that narrative, and make itself an accomplice. More>>

ALSO:

Rail: Greens Back Tauranga – Hamilton – Auckland Service

The Green Party today announced that it will trial a passenger rail service between Auckland, Hamilton and Tauranga starting in 2019, when it is in government. More>>

ALSO:

Housing: Voluntary Rental Warrant Of Fitness For Wellington

Wellington City Council is partnering with the University of Otago, Wellington, to launch a voluntary Rental Warrant of Fitness for minimum housing standards in Wellington, Mayor Justin Lester has announced. More>>

ALSO:

Treaty: Agreement In Principle Signed With Moriori

“The Crown acknowledges Moriori was left virtually landless from 1870, hindering its cultural, social and economic development. The Crown also acknowledges its contribution to the myths that the people of Moriori were racially inferior and became extinct." More>>

ALSO:

Susan Devoy: Call For Inquiry Into State Abuse Reaches UN

Race Relations Commissioner Dame Susan Devoy is in Geneva and has asked a United Nations committee to urge the New Zealand government to initiate an inquiry into the physical and sexual abuse of children and disabled people held in state institutions. More>>

ALSO:

(Not National): Cross-Party Agreement On Pike River Re-Entry

The commitment was signed this afternoon by the leaders of Labour, United Future, The Maori Party, and the Green Party and, together with the earlier commitment by New Zealand First, means that there is now a Parliamentary majority behind the families’ fight for truth and justice. More>>

ALSO:

Earlier:

 
 
 
 
 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

  • PARLIAMENT
  • POLITICS
  • REGIONAL
 
 

Featured InfoPages

Opening the Election