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Police continue to focus on increasing diversity

NZ Police continue to focus on increasing organisational diversity through partnership with Te Wananga o Aotearoa"

The Commissioner of Police, Mike Bush and Te Wananga O Aotearoa CEO, Jim Mather are this afternoon signing a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) to further consolidate a relationship which began in 2007.

The partnership was finalised in 2010 with the signing of the first MoU and the delivery of a Police pre-recruit program for Māori, Pacific and Ethnic applicants.

Commissioner Bush says the resigning of the MoU today is a reflection of our on-going relationship and joint efforts around recruitment to increase the diversity within NZ Police.

“Attracting people with the right skills to serve on the frontline is essential to pursuing our organisational mission to be the safest country in the world and reflect the communities in which we work.”

“As New Zealand grows into an exciting and vibrant place to live with an ever changing population, there is a responsibility which falls on police to encourage and grow the cultural competencies in our staff and throughout the ranks.

“This is one of the major reasons why Valuing Diversity is now one of the core values of the New Zealand Police.

“The variety of language, cultural understanding, sporting connections, and belief systems, adds value to the response provided and staff engagement with communities every day.”

The career preparation course delivered by Te Wananga provides a stepping stone and support network for young people as they apply for an extraordinary career within NZ Police.

Since that first course, over 70 past students have gone on to become constables serving communities around Aotearoa.

Constable Eddie Mulipola, the first graduate of the course to become a Police Officer says the course helped with pretty much everything, I didn’t know what was required to join police, but it gave me all the tools I needed to set me on the path to becoming an officer.

“If I hadn’t done it, I probably wouldn’t have thought about having a go at a Police career on my own, but being part of a group with the same goals, motivated me to keep going.” Constable Shazmeen Khan, the first Muslim women on the course says for as long as I can remember I wanted to join Police.

After attending University, I thought now is a good time to see if I am up to the challenge, and I know I’ve made the right decision.

“It’s the best job you can ever have, it teaches you a lot about life, yourself and what you are capable of achieving.

“Being Muslim has certainly given me an advantage when working with the Muslim community.

I feel they are more open and there is an understanding that they know I can relate to them.”

For more information on becoming a cop visit: www.newcops.co.nz or on the course, visit Te Wananga o Aotearoa website here.

Notes:

There are currently over 100 ethnic groups and Iwi represented among Police frontline staff.
Over the past decade (from 2004 – 2014) there have been increases across the following groups: Women have increased by 44%, Maori have increased by 20%, Pasifika by 57% and Asian by 289%.
In 2014-15, saw a record-breaking proportion of women recruits, with 34% percent attending college.
(The previous high was 31% in 2012-2013).

ENDS

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