Gordon Campbell | Parliament TV | Parliament Today | News Video | Crime | Employers | Housing | Immigration | Legal | Local Govt. | Maori | Welfare | Unions | Youth | Search

 

OIA statistics released

31 January 2017

OIA statistics released

State Services Commissioner Peter Hughes has today published the first set of Official Information Act (OIA) statistics covering 110 different government agencies.

“It is essential that New Zealanders have trust and confidence in their government agencies,” Mr Hughes said.

“Being open and transparent is critical to giving the public confidence. When New Zealanders ask us for information we need to be responsive,” he said.

In 2015 former Chief Ombudsman Dame Beverley Wakem made a number of recommendations in her report into the OIA, ‘Not a Game of Hide and Seek’.

The State Services Commissioner and the Public Service chief executives carefully considered Dame Beverley’s findings and recommendations. In response, they have developed a programme of work to improve how government agencies are complying with the OIA and making information publicly available. The incoming Chief Ombudsman, Judge Peter Boshier, has subsequently also been involved in supporting the work programme.

This programme is a formal commitment in New Zealand’s ‘National Action Plan 2016-18’ under the international Open Government Partnership.

“The government has demonstrated our commitment to improving OIA compliance by making it an independently assessed undertaking as part of an international treaty,” Mr Hughes said.

The first publication of statistics details the number of requests each agency received during the 2015/16 financial year (1 July 2015 – 30 June 2016) and whether they were handled within the timeframe required by the OIA. Over time the information on performance that is gathered and published will increase to provide a more comprehensive picture of compliance with the letter and spirit of the Act.

The Chief Ombudsman is also today releasing data on the complaints his office has received and the complaints they have ‘completed’ between 1 July 2016 and 31 December 2016.

“It’s important to look at these figures as a set to understand the volumes of requests being received and responded to as well as the complaints being made,” Mr Hughes said.

The total number of OIA requests received during 2015/16 was 40,273.

Requests to each agency range from 0 to 11,054. Around half of all requests were received by Police, EQC and the Department of Corrections. Other agencies receiving more than 1,000 requests include the Ministry of Business, Innovation, and Employment, Fire Service Commission, Ministry of Health and Customs Service.

“This is a large number of requests for information and agencies are investing a lot of resources in responding to them,” Mr Hughes said.

Under the OIA agencies are required to respond as soon as practicable, and in a maximum of 20 working days, unless there are grounds to extend the timeframe for response.

“I expect agencies to respond to OIA requests on time in accordance with the Act,” said Mr Hughes.

The timeliness agencies are achieving ranges from a low 39% to 100% on-time. The agency average is 91% of responses handled on-time. This average is however impacted by some outlying low numbers, and agencies’ median rate of on-time responses is 96%. One third of agencies achieve 99% or more on-time, however a quarter are below 85%.

“Most agencies are working hard to respond on time and are achieving a good standard of timeliness,” Mr Hughes said.

“It is clear that some agencies need to improve and have work to do to lift their performance,” he said.

“District health boards stand out as an agency group that is not meeting its timeliness obligations, which is concerning,” said Mr Hughes. “While some DHBs are doing well, too many are consistently late in their responses and need to do better”.

“I have asked the Director-General of Health to work with DHB Chief Executives to focus on improving OIA performance,” he said

SSC and the Office of the Ombudsman are cooperating on the development of improved guidance and training for agencies and people making requests. This guidance and training will help agencies be more consistent in how they manage and respond to requests, and help people seeking information get what they are looking for more easily.

“I’m very pleased to be working closely with the Chief Ombudsman and I appreciate the leadership and support he is giving to this work,” Mr Hughes said.

“Openness and transparency is one of the four pillars of good government, along with free and frank advice, political neutrality and merit based appointment,” Mr Hughes said.

“It is important that we are open with New Zealanders and responsive to their requests,” he said.

“I am backing agencies in their work to improve their openness and SSC will support them to get it right,” said Mr Hughes.

Information on the numbers of requests received and on-time performance is available on SSC’s website http://www.ssc.govt.nz/official-information-act-statistics

Information on the number of complaints received is published by the Chief Ombudsman and is available on the Office of the Ombudsman’s website http://www.ombudsman.parliament.nz/resources-and-publications/oia-complaints-data

ENDS


© Scoop Media

 
 
 
Parliament Headlines | Politics Headlines | Regional Headlines

Commerce Commission: Retail Fuel "Not As Competitive As It Could Be"

The Commission has outlined some options it considers could improve competition. There are two broad sets of options it thinks may have the potential to help create a competitive wholesale market. These are:

• Greater contractual freedom to make it easier for resellers to switch between suppliers; and
• Enabling wider participation in the majors’ joint infrastructure, notably the shared terminals and supporting logistics involved in their borrow-and-loan system.
Further options, including improving the transparency of premium petrol prices, are discussed in the draft report. More>>

 

Promises: Independent Election Policy Costing Unit A Step Closer

The creation of an entity to provide political parties with independent and non-partisan policy costings is a step closer today, according to Finance Minister Grant Robertson and Associate Finance Minister James Shaw. More>>

ALSO:

School's In: Primary And Intermediate Principals Accept New Offer

Primary and intermediate school principals have voted to accept a new settlement from the Ministry of Education, which includes entrenched pay parity with secondary principals. More>>

ALSO:

IPCA On 'Rawshark' Investigation: Multiple Police Failings In Hager Searches Confirmed

The Independent Police Conduct Authority has found that the Police's unlawful search of Nicky Hager's property in October 2014 resulted from an unwitting neglect of duty and did not amount to misconduct by any individual officer... More>>

ALSO:

Broadcasting Standards: Decisions On Coverage Of Mosque Attacks

The Authority upheld one of these complaints, finding that the use of extensive excerpts from the alleged attacker’s livestream video on Sky News New Zealand had the potential to cause significant distress to audiences in New Zealand, and particularly to the family and friends of victims, and the wider Muslim community. More>>

PM's Post-Cab: Bad Mail

Cabinet was updated on the process around prisoners sending mail, following the accused Christchurch gunman sending letters that "should have been stopped". All mail of "high concern prisoners" will now be checked by a specialist team and a changes to the legal criteria for witholding mail are expecting to go to a cabinet committee in this parliamentary session. More>>

Welfare: Ongoing Drug-Test Sanctions Contradicts Govt’s Rhetoric

Reports that two-thirds of beneficiaries who fail drug tests are still having their benefit sanctioned contradicts the Government’s so-called health approach to drugs. More>>

ALSO:

Welfare: More Measures To Help Those Facing Homelessness

Ministers have announced $54 million in Government funding for initiatives which will support at-risk individuals and whānau to stay in their existing tenancies. The funding will also provide additional wrap around services. More>>

ALSO:

Corrections: New Strategy On Māori Reoffending And imprisonment

Authentic co-design with Māori, incorporating a Te Ao Māori worldview, and greater connectedness with whānau are key elements of Hōkai Rangi, Corrections’ new departmental strategy designed to address the long-term challenge of Māori reoffending and imprisonment. More>>

ALSO:

 
 
 
 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

  • PARLIAMENT
  • POLITICS
  • REGIONAL
 
 

InfoPages News Channels