Gordon Campbell | Parliament TV | Parliament Today | News Video | Crime | Employers | Housing | Immigration | Legal | Local Govt. | Maori | Welfare | Unions | Youth | Search

 


OECD & Productivity Commission Report: The Missing Link

WE SUPPORT WECONNECT WE SPEAK UP

New Zealand Manufacturers and Exporters Association

OECD and Productivity Commission Report: Here's the Missing Link - 21 March

Today, the Productivity Commission published its final report on the Tertiary Sector. At the same time, the OECD Environmental Performance Review of New Zealand strongly highlighted the need for a fundamental change in our approach to building wealth sustainably in this country. The need to create an effective education system that can provide much needed skills to facilitate growth and innovation in high-value activities, such as manufacturing, connect these reports, say the New Zealand Manufacturers and Exporters Association (NZMEA).

“The OECD report clearly shows that with New Zealand having the second-highest level of greenhouse gas emissions per GDP unit in the OECD, a continued emphasis on increasing primary production and tourism will not allow us to meet our international climate change obligations. We need to create wealth by growing our high-value industries. The biggest handbrake on growth there, however, are skills shortages that are crippling in some instances now and will only get worse with the rapid technology changes occurring in high-value manufacturing, for example.” said NZMEA Chief Executive Dieter Adam.

“One could have expected an 18-month review of our tertiary education system by the Productivity Commission to at least recognise, let alone address, the fact that we have a largely publicly funded tertiary education system that fails to deliver what New Zealand needs to grow its wealth as a nation. Unfortunately that is not the case – the Productivity Commission has widely missed the mark here in providing a response to skill shortages.

“Instead, we get a strong focus on the academic side of the tertiary sector and the suggestion that more free-market initiatives will enable to tertiary sector to meet its future challenges. As if we didn’t have enough problems currently maintaining quality in a sector where some barriers to entry are low and oversight can be patchy at best. The Commission’s report also aims to make the system even more student-focused, instead of offering suggestions for how to develop a well-functioning and efficient education system that balances the need to meet student desires with the overall needs of our economy to grow on a sustainable basis.

“A balanced system could be achieved, for example, in part by incentivising studies in areas that we know have current and future skill shortages. For example, the incentives offered by government to those taking up apprenticeships in priority trades and construction in 2013. At the same time, businesses also need to be supported to do their part in training and up-skilling their own workforce.

“The Productivity Commission’s report does have some positive suggestions, particularly the need to review and improve careers advice in schools, and expanding the idea of lifelong learning, helping people continue to gain new skills and adapt to changes over time. All in all, however, it substantially misses the opportunity to address one of the more important issues we are facing as a nation – how to equip future generations with the ability to find rewarding careers in an economy subject to strong winds of change.” said Dieter.


© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Parliament Headlines | Politics Headlines | Regional Headlines

Gordon Campbell:
On War Crimes And The Afghan Insurgency

Truly, with friends like former defence Minster Wayne Mapp, the SAS does not need enemies. At the very least, the Hit and Run book has raised the possibility that the New Zealand SAS committed war crimes in the attack they led in Afghnistan upon the villages of Naik and Khak Khuday Dad...

Mapp’s attempted defence of the SAS on RNZ this morning unintentionally indicated that collective punishment was baked into the planning exercise for the raid, and also into how the raid proceeded on the ground. More>>

 

Biscuit Tin Of Democracy: World Heritage Site Protection, Ombudsman and Equal Pay Bills Drawn

On Thursday, 23 March 2017 three places are available on the Order Paper for the first reading of a Member’s bill. The ballot was held, and resulted in the following bills being drawn... More>>

ALSO:

Emissions Plan: NZ Needs More Science, More Trees, Fewer Beasts

A combination of technology breakthroughs, much more plantation forestry, and a big switch away from pastoral, particularly dairy farming, are identified as the key elements of any approach New Zealand takes to reducing its carbon emissions to a net zero level, according to a new report sponsored by the New Zealand chapter of GLOBE, a multi-party, global parliamentary grouping. More>>

ALSO:

"Backed To Win Seats": Labour Māori Seat MPs Won't Stand On List

The Labour Party is backing a request from its Māori seat MPs to stand as electorate MPs only, says Labour Leader Andrew Little. More>>

Productivity Commission: New Models Of Tertiary Education Are Coming

The report is a broad-ranging inquiry into how well New Zealand’s tertiary education system is set up to respond to emerging trends in technology and the internationalisation of education, and changes in the structure of the population, and the skills needed in the economy and society... More>>

ALSO:

PM's Press Conference: Water Everywhere

Monday's Post-Cabinet press conference focused on water, with the Prime Minister fielding questions about the possibility pricing water taken for export. Mr English said the government was directing their water allocation technical advisory group to include export water in considerations. More>>

ALSO:

Kim Workman: Reality Check Needed For Public Service Reoffending Target

Reducing the prison population results in a reduction in re-offending. Shortening sentences reduces reoffending... More>>

ALSO:

PSA: Minister Should Stop Dodging On Salisbury School

"The decision around the future of Salisbury School has been overdue for months, and the ambiguity is leaving parents, staff and students in limbo. It’s time the Minister stopped hiding, muddying the waters and being dishonest about her Ministry’s intentions," says Erin Polaczuk, PSA national secretary. More>>

ALSO:

Get More From Scoop

 

LATEST HEADLINES

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Politics
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news