Gordon Campbell | Parliament TV | Parliament Today | News Video | Crime | Employers | Housing | Immigration | Legal | Local Govt. | Maori | Welfare | Unions | Youth | Search

 

National Party Doubles New Spending Promises In Seven Days

Bribe-O-Meter Update:

National Party Doubles New Spending Promises In Just Seven Days


22 AUGUST 2017
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

National spends-up large...

The National Party has more than doubled its new election spending in the space of just one week, according to the Taxpayers’ Union election costing Bribe-O-Meter. Since last Monday, the National Party has increased promised spending from $2.5 to $6.8 billion across the next parliamentary term. $6.8 billion is equivalent to $3,920 per household.

Mac Mckenna, an economist at the Taxpayers’ Union, said, “The most expensive new policy Bill English has announced is the proposed roads of national significance. The cost works out at approximately one billion each year over the estimated ten-year timeframe. This was accompanied by $290 million in agreed-in-principle treaty settlements; $285 million in cheaper GP visits for children; and $459 million over three years towards the building of a new hospital in Dunedin.”

...so does the Maori Party

The Bribe-O-Meter has also been updated to reflect the Maori Party's manifesto, which was only released last week.

Mr Mckenna said, “Unfortunately, the encompassing policies have about as much fiscal transparency as NZ First. That is they are nearly impossible to cost.”

“From just the policies we have been able to estimate, the Maori Party's policies would cost $12.2 billion over the next parliamentary term. This is equivalent to $7,060 per household. Maori Party policies are predominantly a list of giveaways and subsidies, neither of which come cheap. For example, the largest component of the manifesto that we have been able to cost is an estimated $4 billion write-off of student loan living cost debt.”

Little Difference with Ardern

“There has been some criticism in the political commentariat of the Labour Party not being substantively different in policy under Jacinda Ardern – compared to her predecessor Andrew Little. The Bribe-O-Meter appears to validate this view. Since Ms Ardern has taken over, there has been very little new policy aside from water taxes and a commuter rail service between Auckland, Hamilton and Tauranga.”

“Total Labour Party spending is now at $19.4 billion, which is within $1 billion of Andrew Little’s Labour Party.”

United Future removed

“Peter Dunne’s resignation has led us to remove United Future from the Bribe-O-Meter as without Dunne there is almost zero possibility of United Future returning to Parliament.”

“Last week we criticised Mr Dunne for trying to buy himself into Parliament with taxpayer money. Taxpayers will be breathing a sigh of relief now that they won’t have to front up for Mr Dunne’s $4.7 billion of pork barrel politics.”


height="585">

Media organisatons are welcome to use the image above (downloadable from here) however, we ask that it is attributed to the New Zealand Taxpayers' Union.

Transparency Rating

As part of the Bribe-O-Meter, the Taxpayers' Union economic staff have assessed political party's transparency across policy detail and cost and given each a score out of five (see below). The most transparent parties have been National and the Greens. The least transparent is NZ First, closely followed by the Maori Party.

Key Findings:

• National has promised $6.8 billion in new spending over the next parliamentary term. This equates to $3,920 per household. Transparency rating: 5/5

• Labour has promised $19.4 billion in new spending over the next parliamentary term. This equates to $11,242 per household. Transparency rating: 4/5

• The Green Party has promised $8.5 billion in new spending over the next parliamentary term. This equates to $4,939 per household. Transparency rating: 5/5

• NZ First has promised $23 billion in new spending over the next parliamentary term. This equates to $13,324 per household. Transparency rating: 0/5

• ACT has promised $5.4 billion in taxpayer savings over the next parliamentary term. This equates to $3,103 in savings per household. Transparency rating: 3/5

• The Maori Party has promised $12.2 billion in new spending over the next parliamentary term. This equates to $7,060 per household. Transparency rating: 1/5

• The Opportunities Party has promised $10.7 billion in new spending over the next parliamentary term. This equates to $6,199 per household. Transparency rating: 4/5

For a full breakdown of individual policies refer to http://www.taxpayers.org.nz/bribe_o_meter.

For each party's main policy announcements see:

Labour Party at: http://www.taxpayers.org.nz/bribe_o_meter_labour

Green Party at: http://www.taxpayers.org.nz/bribe_o_meter_green

National Party at: http://www.taxpayers.org.nz/bribe_o_meter_national

New Zealand First at: http://www.taxpayers.org.nz/bribe_o_meter_nz_first

ACT Party at: http://www.taxpayers.org.nz/bribe_o_meter_act

Maori Party at: http://www.taxpayers.org.nz/bribe_o_meter_maori_party

The Opportunities Party at: http://www.taxpayers.org.nz/bribe_o_meter_top

ENDS


© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Parliament Headlines | Politics Headlines | Regional Headlines

Gordon Campbell: PPPs Are Steven Joyce’s New Imaginary Friend

Like the kid in that Bruce Willis movie who could see dead people, Finance Minister Steven Joyce can see stuff (like holes in Labour budgets) that no-one else can see.

So maybe it shouldn’t be all that surprising that Joyce can also see ‘efficiencies’ and ‘cost savings’ in funding major infrastructural projects through public private partnerships (PPPs). More>>

 
 

Indecision 2017: Election Day Results

National won 46% of the vote with Labour on 35.8%. NZ First won 7.5%, with the Greens on 5.8%. ACT held on to Epsom, but failed to get more MPs. The Maori Party were wiped out of Parliament. There are still special votes to be counted, but clearly National is in the box seat to form the next Government. Full preliminary results >>

ALSO:

Lyndon Hood: Election Lists

While the ship of state is listing, so I thought I would make some lists as well. More>>

ALSO:

Targetting: ACC’s Computer-Aided Decision-Making Questioned

University of Otago researchers are warning of the potential pitfalls in government departments using computer-based risk prediction models, as has been recently revealed through a controversial new tool used by the ACC... More>>

ALSO:

From The Hood: The Campaign Strategist’s Lament

"This election is a chance to really work the record of what nine years of National-led government has done to improve the country for everyone. Or will do. Another three years, maybe six. Thirty-three years, tops. You don’t want to risk that, do you? More>>

PSA Report: National Gets An ‘F’ For Health Funding

"Seeing National’s record on health collected in one place is quite sobering - it’s clear that underfunding is having dire consequences on both patients and staff, who are having to do more than ever with less," says Glenn Barclay, PSA national secretary. More>>

ALSO:

 
 
 
 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

  • PARLIAMENT
  • POLITICS
  • REGIONAL
 
 

Featured InfoPages

Opening the Election
 
 
 
  • PublicAddress
  • Pundit
  • Kiwiblog