Gordon Campbell | Parliament TV | Parliament Today | News Video | Crime | Employers | Housing | Immigration | Legal | Local Govt. | Maori | Welfare | Unions | Youth | Search

 

Realising Māori potential focus of dynamic new partnership

Realising Māori potential focus of dynamic new partnership

A shared vision to reduce child poverty rates and social inequity is at the heart of a new funding arrangement between Te Rūnanga o Ngāi Tahu and the Peter McKenzie Project (an initiative of the J R McKenzie Trust).

The grant, worth almost $1.4m over five years, is the largest amount ever funded in the history of the J R McKenzie Trust and will be used to help fund a social innovation lab to be based within Te Rūnanga o Ngāi Tahu. This is a co-investment arrangement whereby both Ngāi Tahu and the Peter McKenzie Project have committed funds to the initiative in a bid to spearhead change and maximise collective impact.

“This is an incredibly exciting opportunity for Te Rūnanga o Ngāi Tahu to be partnering with the Peter McKenzie Project, and to have received this very generous funding contribution alongside our own commitment. As we well know the statistics relating to Māori and inequality will continue to grow as our Māori population grows if we do not turn outcomes around. The kind of systemic change required to make a real difference will take time and this has been recognised by the long-term nature of our funding agreement,” says Te Rūnanga o Ngāi Tahu Chief Executive Officer, Arihia Bennett.

“Our goal is to achieve equity in education, employment and income for all Māori in our takiwā by 2040. We know these are key drivers of whānau empowerment, security and prosperity, and, in transforming outcomes for tamariki.”

The project will be led by the recently established Tokona Te Raki, a social innovation hub headed by Dr Eruera Tarena which has been set up specifically with a focus on using collaboration and innovation to create the transformational pathways that will create equity in education, employment and income, that will ultimately see Māori potential being realised.

“Changing the system means moving beyond business as usual and working together to develop new and bold solutions to take us forward. We need to utilise the strengths already within our communities and to ensure we are all actively contributing to Māori success,” says Arihia Bennett.

“We have found the perfect partner in the Peter McKenzie Project. They share our vision and commitment.”

The Peter McKenzie Project is an initiative of the J R McKenzie Trust (a philanthropic family trust that has been granting funds to create a better New Zealand for almost 80 years) and has $15 million to spend over the next 20 years, to contribute to reducing child and family poverty in New Zealand.

Peter McKenzie Project director Iain Hines believes the solution lies in creating long-term, systemic change: "Complex problems need thoughtful, joined-up solutions and sustained support to effect real change. Most funding doesn't have those long-term horizons.

"Poverty and hardship are complex. We need to take into account the contributing personal circumstances and the systems that can lock people into poverty. The Peter McKenzie Project wants to encourage a different way of thinking.”

Both partners acknowledge that they do not know what the solutions will be in advance, but are committed to an adaptive approach where they will be co-created and designed specifically to address the root causes of inequality and poverty rather than just treating the symptoms.

“This approach is both exciting and daunting. Changing systems is not straightforward or linear; we need bold and thoughtful experimentation. We are delighted to be partners in the Tokona Te Raki social innovation hub which we think will be a key driver in creating a better tomorrow for our tamariki, whānau and communities”, says Mr Hines.


© Scoop Media

 
 
 
Parliament Headlines | Politics Headlines | Regional Headlines

Mediaworks: Three to be sold or closed

MediaWorks has today announced that it intends to sell MediaWorks TV as well as its Flower Street property which includes its television head office and studios.

The intention is for MediaWorks to sell the television side of the business while retaining ownership of radio and QMS. The Flower Street property will also be put up for sale with a lease back option for a buyer to continue to operate television from that location.

MediaWorks Chairman Jack Matthews said that MediaWorks is committed to continuing to grow its business in New Zealand while recognising that free-to-air television operates in a challenging environment. More>>

 
 

Could Do Better: Post-Sroubek Review Of Deportation Info

Ms Tremain acknowledges that the review highlighted some aspects of the process that can be improved and makes five main recommendations to strengthen the existing processes for preparing files for decision-makers. Those recommendations are: More>>

ALSO:

Gordon Campbell: On A New Book On The Leaky Homes Scandal

We all know that journalism is short of cash and under pressure from the speed, brevity and clickbait pressures of the 24/7 news cycle… but hey, given the right subject and a sufficiently stubborn journalist, it can still surpass most of the works of the academic historians... More>>

Regulation: Review Finds NZTA Road Safety Failings

The independent review, carried out by consultant agency MartinJenkins, lists at least 10 reasons for the failures including the agency being focused on customer service at the expense of its policing functions. More>>

ALSO:

Rod Carr: Climate Change Commission Chair-Designate Announced

Climate Change Minister James Shaw has today announced the appointment of Dr Rod Carr as Chair-designate for the Climate Change Commission. More>>

ALSO:

Compliance Complaints: 'Putting Right' Holidays Act Underpayment In Health

The Government is putting right a decade’s worth of underpayment to nurses, doctors and other health workers, says Health Minister Dr David Clark. More>>

ALSO:

IPCA: Disasterous Police Pursuit, Excessive Use Of Dogs

At no stage did Police follow the correct procedure for the commencement of a pursuit... A Police dog handler used his dog to help with the arrest of two of the young people. One suffered injuries resulting in his hospitalisation, and the Authority found that the use of the dog was an excessive use of force. More>>

ALSO:

‘Hard Place To Be Happy’: Report On Youth Residential Care

Children’s Commissioner Andrew Becroft says the report, A Hard Place to be Happy, contains important challenges from children and young people, aged 9 to 17, about their experiences in care and protection residences. “I found this report extremely difficult to read, and I think most New Zealanders would too.” More>>

Africa And Middle East Refugees: 'Family Link' Restriction Removed

The founder of the Double the Quota campaign has applauded the coalition government for Friday’s announcement that a discriminatory policy would be removed. More>>

ALSO:

 
 
 
 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

  • PARLIAMENT
  • POLITICS
  • REGIONAL
 
 

InfoPages News Channels