Gordon Campbell | Parliament TV | Parliament Today | News Video | Crime | Employers | Housing | Immigration | Legal | Local Govt. | Maori | Welfare | Unions | Youth | Search

 

Increasing Evidence Shows Sugar Taxes Ineffective

The New Zealand Beverage Council (NZBC) says that calls for a sugar tax on sugar-sweetened beverages are misguided and there is increasing international evidence that shows sugar taxes are ineffective in reducing obesity.

Council spokesperson Stephen Jones says a major report released earlier in the year by the NZIER found that the evidence that sugar taxes improve health outcomes was weak.

“In their research, NZIER analysed 47 peer-reviewed studies and working papers relating to sugar taxes. They found that no study based on actual experience with sugar taxes has identified any impact on health outcomes.”

“In Mexico, where a tax has been in place since 2014, there has been no meaningful impact on the long-term consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages or on caloric intake, and obesity rates in that country have continued to climb since the tax was introduced.

“And in Berkley, which introduced a tax in 2015, a tax on sugar-sweetened beverages has actually seen overall calorie intake increase as consumers switched from purchasing taxed soft drinks to non-taxed juices, smoothies and milk, which often contain more sugar.

“These are the reasons why they McKinsey Global Institute’s report Overcoming Obesity: An Initial economic Analysis found that taxing sugar is actually one of the least effective interventions in combatting obesity.

“Instead the Institute found the most effective measures to combat obesity include reformulating drinks, offering smaller portion sizes and providing better education, which we strongly agree with.

“The reality is that the causes of New Zealand’s increasing obesity rates are numerous and complex, and include the over-consumption of high-energy processed food, a lack of physical activity, environmental factors, parental health and genetic pre-disposition.

“It is also too simplistic to blame New Zealand’s obesity rates solely on sugar. In fact, the intake of sugar and sugar-sweetened beverages fell in both New Zealand and Australia at the same time as obesity rates have been increasing.

“Since 2010, soft drink consumption has fallen by more than four percent, while sales of low and no-sugar beverages have grown by two-thirds over the past decade, and government data shows that just five percent of New Zealand adult’s calories come from non-alcoholic beverages.

“In saying this, like all food manufacturers, we know that we are part of the problem and we need to be part of the solution.

“That is why our members have taken significant steps to provide consumers with more choice, better education and improved information, allowing consumers to make more informed dietary choices.

“This includes the launch and heavy promotion of low and no-sugar varieties and our strong support of the government’s Healthy Star Rating System.

“Further, our members have pledged to only directly sell bottled water to primary and intermediate schools and to not sell sugar-sweetened beverages to secondary schools as part of our commitment to sugar free schools.

“We believe that education and nutritional literacy and increased physical activity are key to changing the obesity trends in New Zealand and that a sugar tax will do little to improve the health of New Zealanders.”

ENDS

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
Parliament Headlines | Politics Headlines | Regional Headlines

Gordon Campbell: On The Tax Working Group’s Road Map

Trying to analyse the interim report on the Tax Working Group (TWG) is like trying to review an entire All Blacks game, but at the half- time mark.

With so much still to be finalised, Sir Michael Cullen and his colleagues are going to need all the All Blacks’ fabled finishing skills to get a coherent, fiscally neutral package together by the February 2019 deadline. More>>

 

Meth Testing Report: Housing NZ "To Right Wrong"

Phil Twyford “Housing NZ acknowledges that around 800 tenants suffered by either losing their tenancies, losing their possessions, being suspended from the public housing waiting list, negative effects on their credit ratings or, in the worst cases, being made homeless.” More>>

ALSO:

No Reshuffle: Meka Whaitiri Removed As A Minister

Meka Whaitiri will be removed as a Minister with immediate effect... The decision was made after receiving a report into an incident that occurred on 27 August in Gisborne, involving Meka Whaitiri and one of her staff. More>>

ALSO:

Pay Equity Bill: Making History For Women’s Pay

The Equal Pay Amendment Bill, introduced to the House today, will make it easier for workers to make a pay equity claim , using a more simple and accessible process within New Zealand’s existing bargaining framework. More>>

ALSO:

Suffrage 125: NZ A Trailblazer For Women

“We acknowledge the work of Kate Sheppard, Meri Te Tai Mangakāhia, and all of the suffragists who tirelessly campaigned for the vote… Today we also need to ask each other: how we can continue to make our country a fairer and better place to continue the legacy of the suffragists.” More>>

ALSO:

Asylum: Refugee Quota Increasing To 1500

“The quota increase will take place from July 2020. In the meantime, we will work to increase the number and spread of refugee resettlement and support services. We need to make sure we’re prepared for this change in policy.” More>>

ALSO:

 
 
 
 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

  • PARLIAMENT
  • POLITICS
  • REGIONAL
 
 

InfoPages News Channels