Gordon Campbell | Parliament TV | Parliament Today | News Video | Crime | Employers | Housing | Immigration | Legal | Local Govt. | Maori | Welfare | Unions | Youth | Search

 

What New Zealanders think of Refugees and Immigration

Most New Zealanders want to keep accepting refugees, but a growing number perceive that immigration is putting too much pressure on public services.

Auckland, 20th September 2018 – A day after the government announced an increase in the New Zealand refugee quota, research company Ipsos New Zealand has released the findings of their third report on New Zealanders’ attitudes to refugees and immigration.

New Zealanders tend to feel positive, and increasingly so, about immigration and refugees:

Most New Zealanders want to keep accepting refugees, with 62% disagreeing with the statement “We must close our borders to refugees entirely – we can’t accept any at this time”. However, this is a decrease of 5 points from 2017, with slightly more people now feeling we should close our borders (29%, up from 26% in 2016).

• At 56%, slightly more New Zealanders feel confident that most refugees who come to New Zealand will successfully integrate into New Zealand, compared to 53% in 2016. In contrast, a third disagreed, indicating that a sizeable minority still question how well refugees can assimilate.

• 55% feel that immigration makes New Zealand a more interesting place to live, up from 49% in 2017.

• 51% feel that immigration is good for the New Zealand economy, up from 47% in 2017 and 51% in 2016.

Additionally, a similar proportion of respondents both agreed and disagreed with the statement, “There are terrorists pretending to be refugees who will enter New Zealand to cause violence and destruction” (40% combined disagree vs. 41% combined agree in 2018).



At 65%, more New Zealanders now feel that priority should be given to immigrants with higher education and qualifications who could potentially fill shortages in some professions compared to 58% last year.

Additionally, fewer New Zealanders feel that there are too many immigrants in New Zealand in 2018 (40%, compared to 44% in 2017; and that immigration is causing New Zealand to change in a way that New Zealanders don’t like (34% vs. 37% in 2017).

New Zealanders are becoming more apprehensive about the overall impact of immigration:

Despite New Zealanders feeling positive about what immigrants can offer New Zealand, the number feeling that immigration is having a positive impact has fallen from 47% in 2016 to 41% this year – and 53% feel that immigration has led to too much pressure on the country’s public services such as transport, health and education (similar to 2017’s level of 52%).

Commenting on the findings, Dr Richard Griffiths, Research Manager, Ipsos New Zealand, said: “During the past week there has been a range of issues reported by the mainstream news media about immigration and refugees. This includes the New Zealand Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern expressing an interest in doubling the quota of refugees coming into the country and the far-right Sweden Democrats taking eighteen percent of the vote in Sweden’s national elections last weekend . The results of our immigration survey are encouraging in how accommodating and approving New Zealanders generally feel towards immigrants such as them making our country a more interesting place to live or the perception that refugees will be able to integrate successfully into our society. The key to a successful immigration policy is felt to lie in encouraging immigrants with required skills and also ensuring that our public service and infrastructure can cope.

Carin Hercock, Managing Director, Ipsos New Zealand, added: “Net migration has been the main driver of population growth over the last five years, with our population estimated to have hit 4.9million in August, so understanding New Zealanders’ perceptions and attitudes to immigration is an important insight into how New Zealanders feel about the society and culture we live in. The fact that an increasing majority of New Zealanders agree that ‘new’ New Zealanders make our country a more interesting place to live is positive however there is also continued concern on the pressure immigration has placed on our public services. Ipsos will continue to monitor these attitudes over time.”

About this Study:

A total of 611 New Zealanders over the age of 18 answered questions about immigration that were part of the latest Ipsos New Zealand Global Advisor survey which ran from Friday 20th July to Wednesday 25th July 2018. Please note that the maximum margin of error for a sample of 611 at the 95% confidence level is 4%. A number of the immigration questions were also asked in 2016 and 2017 in previous Global Advisor surveys.

Our Global Advisor survey is run approximately 3-4 times per year in New Zealand and seeks New Zealand citizens’ opinions on a wide range of topics. The latest iteration of the Ipsos New Zealand Global Advisor survey covered topics that included immigration, cyberbullying, the Auckland regional fuel tax, the 3 most important issues facing New Zealand (Ipsos NZ Issues Monitor), and how people rate the government’s performance over the last 6 months.

This study did not have any external sponsors or partners. It was initiated and run by Ipsos, because we are curious about the world we live in and how citizens around the globe think and feel about their world.


© Scoop Media

 
 
 
Parliament Headlines | Politics Headlines | Regional Headlines

Terror in NZ: Mosques Attacked in Christchurch

• There have been two attacks at the Masjid Al Noor Mosque next to Hagley Park, and at the Linwood Masjid Mosque in the suburb of Linwood, Christchurch
• Police commissioner says 50 confirmed dead in Christchurch terrorist attacks. One man charged with murder appeared in court on Saturday, two more apprehended - working to understand their involvement
• PM Jacinda Ardern has described it as a "terrorist attack" by those holding extremist views. She says NZ's gun laws will change.
• The national security threat level has been increased from low to high.
• Commissioner Bush said there were explosive devices attached to one vehicle that were stopped by police and these have been made safe by Defence Force personnel.

More>>

Gordon Campbell: On Effective Changes To Gun Laws And The SIS
Already, the government has signalled that its response to the Christchurch mosque shootings will proceed on two main fronts (a) changes to the gun laws (b) changes to the current surveillance behaviours of the Police and the SIS... More>>

.

 
 

"Grabbed And Struck In The Face": Greens Co-Leader Attacked While Walking To Work

Green Party co-leader James Shaw was the victim of an unprovoked attack when he was walking to work in Wellington. More>>

ALSO:

████████ ████ ███: Latest OIA Statistics Released

The latest statistics cover 110 agencies that collectively completed 18,106 official information requests between July and December 2018, a 16.4% increase on the 15,551 requests for the previous six months. More>>

ALSO:

'Hit And Run' Inquiry: New Legal Action Over Secrecy

The lawyer representing the Afghan villagers in the inquiry into Operation Burnham has launched legal proceedings calling for a judicial review in the investigation. More>>

ALSO:

From Hydro Plan To...: Mokihinui River Land To Join Kahurangi National Park

A total of 64,400 hectares of conservation land in the Mokihinui River catchment on the West Coast north of Westport, including 15 km of riverbed, is being added to Kahurangi National Park. “Adding this area, roughly half the size of Auckland City, to Kahurangi is the largest addition of land to an existing national park in New Zealand’s history,” Eugenie Sage said. More>>

ALSO:

Gordon Campbell: On Shane Jones (And A Huawei Update)

For better and worse, this is a small country... any major business initiative aiming to benefit the Maori community in Northland is likely to come across the radar of a local Maori politician called Shane Jones. More>>

ALSO:

National's Political Donations: SFO To Investigate Jami-Lee Ross' Complaint

Independent MP Jami-Lee Ross says he understands the Serious Fraud Office (SFO) investigation into a complaint on a National Party donation is looking at tracing the money back through different bank accounts. More>>

ALSO:

Pike River: Drift Re-Entry Scheduled For 3 May

Minister Responsible for Pike River Re-entry Andrew Little has announced that in light of the current state of preparations, the scheduled date to commence re-entering and recovering the access tunnel to the Pike River Mine (the drift) will be Friday 3rd May. More>>

 
 
 
 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

  • PARLIAMENT
  • POLITICS
  • REGIONAL
 
 

InfoPages News Channels