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Internet Safe Management Service To Go On Trial

From the Foundation for Research, Science and Technology For immediate release

INTERNET SAFE MANAGEMENT SERVICE TO GO ON TRIAL

A means of controlling digital locks on safes from anywhere in the world using the Internet has been developed by Auckland company Electronic Locking Systems. The company, which is about to trial the Globalock Service with potential customers in Australia and New Zealand, developed the system to centralise the control and management of high-security digital combination locks used by banks, stores and restaurant chains. Globalock consists of two parts - a lock management service and a lock controller. The Globalock lock management service is a secure web site that allows clients to control and manage their digital locks from anywhere, using a normal web browser. The Globalock lock controller is an electronic box attached to the inside of the safe door and linked to the lock. It receives the information that controls the lock via the Wide Area Pager Network. "A security or store manager might want to change the access schedules or the access combinations of a lock or group of locks at locations remote from them," says Electronic Locking Systems director John Hodgson. "All they have to do is gain access to the web page and make the changes. The information will then be sent to the locks." Technology New Zealand - part of the Foundation for Research, Science and Technology - helped to fund the project. Mr Hodgson says its support was vital to the project because it gave the company the chance to engage specialist consultants and technology partners. He says two things have made Globalock possible - the Internet and the growing use of digital locks. "The Internet is accessible anywhere and digital locks are rapidly replacing older mechanical locks. As digital locks get more sophisticated, however, users are finding them hard to manage. "Centralised management with Globalock makes digital locks easy to use and offers greater control and security because the management issues are taken off site." Electronic Locking Systems is an electronic research and development company with six employees. The company intends to manufacture the Globalock controllers itself and operate the Internet-based Globalock Lock Management Service. -ends-

Contact:

* John Hodgson, Electronic Locking Systems Ltd, 8 Target Court, Glenfield, Auckland 10. Ph: (09) 443-9501. Fax: (09) 441-2867. Email: john@globalock.com

* Ian Gray, Technology New Zealand (Auckland Office) at the Foundation for Research, Science and Technology. Ph: (09) 912-6730, or 021 660 409. Website: www.technz.co.nz

Prepared on behalf of the Foundation for Research, Science and Technology by ID Communications. Contact: Ian Carson (04) 477-2525. Email: ian@idcomm.co.nz

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