Video | Business Headlines | Internet | Science | Scientific Ethics | Technology | Search

 


Clean green way to dye wool takes off

An Australian-invented method for dyeing wool is poised to revolutionise the way elite quality fashion fabrics are coloured in the 21st Century.

CSIRO Textile and Fibre Technology (TFT) announced today it has licensed its acclaimed Sirolan-LTD® wool dyeing technology to Australia Pacific Specialty Chemical Limited, APS, in partnership with The Woolmark Company.

Sirolan-LTD® is the outcome of more than 12 years' research into cleaner, greener and more cost efficient ways to dye high quality wool textiles by scientists at CSIRO TFT in Geelong.

The technique employs a special helper— chemical (an auxiliary) called Valsol LTA-N to pretreat the surface of the wool fibres so they take up even deep shades more rapidly and evenly, while using less energy to do so.

"We began by studying how dyes actually penetrate the wool fibre, finding their way through tiny gaps between the microscopic scales on its surface," explains CSIRO TFT's Dr John Rippon.

"We then looked for a chemical that would modify these gaps to allow the dye to diffuse into the fibre more rapidly and evenly.

"The result is that pre-treated wool takes up dye in half the time or at a lower temperature. Either way it saves the processor energy, reduces greenhouse emissions and lowers costs," he says.

"It also overcomes the problem of uneven dye uptake by the wool caused by natural weathering of the tips of the fibres when the wool is on the sheep. It's particularly effective for dyeing wool-nylon blends evenly."

Sirolan-LTD® can be used at a lower temperature — 85-90 degrees Celsius, instead of at the boil, or else the mixture can be boiled for a much shorter time. On average, this cuts electricity demand in the dyeing process by around 20 per cent — and greenhouse emissions by a similar proportion.

It results in much more uptake of dye and mothproofers by the fibre, leaving clear water to be discharged by the processor into the environment. The substance itself also biodegrades easily and leaves no toxic residues.

Dyeing the wool at a lower temperature, or for a shorter time at the boil, results in far less fibre damage than conventional dyeing methods. This in turn leads to greater efficiencies in the spinning and weaving stages.

Dr Rippon says that Sirolan-LTD® works with all kinds of wool dyes, but its benefits are most apparent with dyes of high molecular weight used to produce elite worsteds for top quality men's and women's suits and fashion apparel. It can be used as a replacement for all existing dye auxiliaries.

The new licence grants APS, rights to market the process around the world.

"We're very optimistic about the market potential of the process. This is now a proven technology which is receiving excellent feedback from wool processors who are using it," Dr Rippon says.

"It is perfectly profiled for 21st century textile fabrics — it's clean, green and economic."

More information: Dr John Rippon, CSIRO Textile and Fibre Technology, (00613) 5246 4081 or visit www.csiro.au or www.australia.org.nz

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Business Headlines | Sci-Tech Headlines

 

I Sing The Highway Electric: Charge Net NZ To Connect New Zealand

BMW is turning Middle Earth electric after today announcing a substantial contribution to the charging network Charge Net NZ. This landmark partnership will enable Kiwis to drive their electric vehicles (EVs) right across New Zealand through the installation of a fast charging highway stretching from Kaitaia to Invercargill. More>>

ALSO:

Watch This Space: Mahia Rocket Lab Launch Site Officially Opened

Economic Development Minster Steven Joyce today opened New Zealand’s first orbital launch site, Rocket Lab Launch Complex 1, on the Mahia Peninsula on the North Island’s east coast. More>>

Earlier:

Marketing Rocks!
Ig Nobel Award Winners Assess The Personality Of Rocks

A Massey University marketing lecturer has received the 2016 Ig Nobel Prize for economics for a research project that asked university students to describe the “brand personalities” of three rocks. More>>

ALSO:

Nurofen Promotion: Reckitt Benckiser To Plead Guilty To Misleading Ads

Reckitt Benckiser (New Zealand) intends to plead guilty to charges of misleading consumers over the way it promoted a range of Nurofen products, the Commerce Commission says. More>>

ALSO:

Half A Billion Accounts, Including Xtra: Yahoo Confirms Huge Data Breach

The account information may have included names, email addresses, telephone numbers, dates of birth, hashed passwords (the vast majority with bcrypt) and, in some cases, encrypted or unencrypted security questions and answers. More>>

ALSO:

Rural Branches: Westpac To Close 19 Branches, ANZ Looks At 7

Westpac confirms it will close nineteen branches across the country; ANZ closes its Ngaruawahia branch and is consulting on plans to close six more branches; The bank workers union says many of its members are nervous about their futures and asking ... More>>

Interest Rates: RBNZ's Wheeler Keeps OCR At 2%

Reserve Bank governor Graeme Wheeler kept the official cash rate at 2 percent and said more easing will be needed to get inflation back within the target band. More>>

ALSO:

Get More From Scoop

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Sci-Tech
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news