Video | Business Headlines | Internet | Science | Scientific Ethics | Technology | Search

 

Colour change protects bees …from sex traps


Media Release August 9, 2000

Colour change protects bees …from sex traps

Bees are great, they are beneficial, and it is not good for them to be caught in pest monitoring traps used in Integrated Fruit Production.

To protect the bees the pheromone traps have undergone a colour change. HortResearch insect science staff have worked out which colours bees are attracted to, and moth pheromone traps used in Integrated Fruit Production (that until now have been white), are to be replaced by coloured traps that do not appeal to bees.

Research in Auckland, Canterbury, Hawke's Bay, Nelson and Central Otago determined the impact of trap colour on the capture of target and non-target insects. Catches of native and introduced bees were much lower in red and green traps than in the yellow, blue and the standard white traps.

Max Suckling, manager of HortResearch's pipfruit sustainability group, is this week presenting a paper on the topic to the New Zealand Plant Protection Conference in Christchurch. Dr Suckling said, "The new traps are more bee friendly, they have almost no bee catch, yet they are just as efficient for catching the moth pests."

The researchers found that honeybees (Apis mellifera) and bumblebees (Bombus spp.) were mostly attracted to white and blue traps. Native bees (Lasioglossum spp. and Hylaeus spp.) were found in white traps, followed by yellow traps with a few caught in green traps.

Trap colour did not affect catch of the target species such as codling moth, and lightbrown apple moth.



As a result of this work replacement of the standard traps with coloured traps (red or green) is recommended to orchardists to reduce impacts on non-target species, particularly during flowering, when traps have sometimes not been used in order to reduce the risk of catching bees. A reduction in non-target species catch should reduce the need for the sticky base to be changed so often.

words 305

For more information please contact: Dr Max Suckling, HortResearch, Canterbury Research Station, Tel: 03 325 6609. Fax: 03 325 6663. Mobile 025 284 583. Email: msuckling@hort.cri.nz or Liz Brook, Communications Manager, HortResearch, Tel: 06 351 7000 Ext 7749 Fax: 06 351 7038 Mobile: 025 505 912 A/h: 06 328 9836 Email: lbrook@hort.cri.nz

Liz Brook Communications Manager HortResearch Corporate Office Private Bag 11 030 Palmerston North New Zealand

Tel: +64 (6) 351 7000 Ext 7749 Fax: +64 (6) 351 7038 Mobile: 025 505 912


© Scoop Media

 
 
 
Business Headlines | Sci-Tech Headlines

 

Fish & Game Support: Canterbury Officer Of Health Warns On Nitrates In Water

"Nitrate testing of 114 drinking water samples from across the Canterbury plains showed that more than half of them were above the level considered safe in the world's largest ever study on the impacts of nitrates in drinking water." More>>

ALSO:

Partnerships Investment Round: Government Invests In Cancer Research, Pines, Ryegrass

The Government will invest $14.4 million into transformative new scientific research programmes including cutting-edge cancer treatment and vertical farming, Research, Science and Innovation Minister Megan Woods announced today. More>>

ALSO:

Stats: Net Migration Remains High

“Since late 2014, annual net migration has ranged between 48,000 and 64,000,” population indicators manager Tehseen Islam said. “The only previous time net migration was at these levels was for a short period in the early 2000s.” More>>

ALSO:

Retail: Costco To Open First NZ Store At Westgate In Auckland

American multi-national discount store operator Costco Wholesale is planning to open its first New Zealand store at the Westgate shopping centre in Auckland’s north-west. More>>

ALSO:

RNZ Report: Fungal Disease Claims Life Of Seventh Kākāpō

A seventh kākāpō being treated for the respiratory disease aspergillosis has died. Nora 1-A was just over 100 days old and was the sickest of the kākāpō being treated at the New Zealand Centre Conservation Medicine at Auckland Zoo. More>>