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Cleaner Water From New Monitor

A new electronic monitor developed by Accurate Measurements Ltd of Auckland could result in a cleaner, better-quality water supply from treatment plants.

The monitor, to be launched on the New Zealand market soon, makes sure water is kept clean by controlling the dosage of chemicals at treatment plants. It will be half the price of existing models, putting it in reach of small local authorities and water treatment operators, says Accurate Measurements director and sales and marketing manager Brett Hellier.

"The monitor automatically senses the amount of dirt in water by the positive or negative charges of the particles," Mr Hellier says. "It alters the dosage accordingly, and the chemicals cling to the dirt and carry them away. The idea is to get no dirt."

Mr Hellier says the sensor is part of a stainless steel box that includes electronics and an onboard computer. The box is fitted to a treatment plant's clarifier outlet pipe. The system was developed with the help of Technology New Zealand, part of the Foundation for Research, Science and Technology.

The monitor could help small local authorities and operators achieve higher Ministry of Health water standard grades, Mr Hellier says. "The ministry grades water from A down to G. Under New Zealand regulations, if councils and other operators want their water treatment plants to meet A or B standards, they must have a 'streaming current monitor'. Most councils, especially the smaller ones, can't afford the monitors because they usually cost about $20,000 each.



"The Accurate monitor, however, will cost a lot less, which means A or B-grade water is now within the reach of small councils with limited budgets," he says.

Accurate Measurements specialises in making instruments for water treatment and work on the new monitor began three years ago. "We did it as an export project, because the New Zealand market is simply not big enough. We see a potential market in New Zealand of more than 200 local authority water treatment plants and even more industrial users. But the overseas potential is huge," Mr Hellier says.

-ends-

Contact * Brett Hellier, Accurate Measurements Ltd, 160 Rockfield Rd, Penrose, Auckland. Ph: (09) 579-0141. Fax (09) 579-1888. Email: bretth@accurate.co.nz * Nigel Metge, Technology New Zealand at the Foundation for Research, Science and Technology (Auckland Office), (09) 912-6730, or 021 454-095. Website: www.technz.co.nz

Prepared on behalf of the Foundation for Research, Science and Technology by ID Communications. Contact: Ian Carson (04) 477-2525, ian@idcomm.co.nz


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