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New law should be vetted for compliance costs

Media release 9 May 2001

New law should be vetted for compliance costs

The Hazardous Substances and New Organisms (HSNO) Act should be vetted for compliance costs, says Business NZ.

Business NZ Chief Executive Simon Carlaw says the Act will impose huge compliance costs on businesses and will hold back innovation.

"The HSNO Act will slow down the introduction of new materials and techniques, making New Zealand companies less competitive than those in other countries. New Zealand businesses will have to develop complicated and costly new evaluation, recording and registering processes and pay thousands of dollars in application and hearing fees. New Zealand businesses that use any chemical substance - paint, ink, solvent, adhesive, fertiliser, polymers, fertilisers and others - will face higher costs.

"New Zealand businesses accept the need for safety checks for new materials and techniques, but these should not result in disproportionate compliance costs.

"Implementation of the hazardous substances part of the Act will include the introduction into law of one of the largest package of regulations ever produced in New Zealand.

"It is of critical importance, therefore, that the new law be reviewed by the Government's Business Compliance Panel before it is enacted in July," Mr Carlaw said.

ENDS

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