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Business model shows SurfBrains.com the money

Press Release, for immediate release:

Practical business model shows SurfBrains.com the money

In a time of rampant dot com crashes one test of the long term profitability of an online business is whether it would work in the real world. Somewhere down the track web sites have to turn a profit, and in a world where web surfers are increasingly unwilling to pay for content, substance has to prevail.

This was the vision behind SurfBrains.com, a consulting site with a difference. Although offered start-up capital, SurfBrains has in fact funded itself out of its own profits. This has been made possible by keeping overheads to the minimum and offering a quality service that is badly needed and web users around the world are happy to pay for.

SurfBrains.com works like a breakdown assistance service for the business and academic worlds. Basically the company has a stable of experts qualified and experienced in a wide variety of fields ranging from programming, accounting and engineering to web development. All the experts have been carefully interviewed and selected, and need to keep up high quality work in order to stay on the site. These experts can be accessed from the site 24/7.

The site’s bread and butter are people in business and students who are stuck, out of their depth and don’t know where to turn. They go to SurfBrains.com, find an expert and get the help needed to proceed with a project or understand a subject area. This could be for instance to sort out a programming obstacle with a web development project, to design a decent ad for an upcoming magazine deadline or simply to explain and demonstrate some finance concepts.

The site is constantly busy rescuing people who are stuck, desperate and facing deadlines. Following the old adage of ‘when people need something they will buy’ is the essence of the SurfBrains business model and maintaining a high quality network of expert consultants provides the competitive edge.

Kind Regards Simon Angelo Server Manager Mail: simon@surfbrains.com Voice: +64 9 625 5590 www.surfbrains.com, pick the brains of an expert.

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