Video | Business Headlines | Internet | Science | Scientific Ethics | Technology | Search

 

Tegel – No Longer Chicken!!

Auckland, Tuesday 28th August – GE free consumers around the country will welcome today’s announcement that Tegel is now sourcing their chicken feed from non genetically engineered crops.

Tegel is responsible for importing 50 000 tonnes of soy bean meal from the US into NZ, to feed it’s chickens. During the past year thousands of people have sent postcards, emails and letters calling on Tegel to “not be chicken, and to go GE free”. Todays response by Tegel is a clear indication that the future of the market place is in GE free products.

“Tegel have recognised the public rejection of GE, and have responded accordingly. This is a victory for public opinion and reinforces the necessity for NZ to be GE free in our environment and food chain,” said Annette Cotter, Greenpeace campaigner.

Greenpeace has been campaigning to get Tegel to source GE free soy meal for their chicken feed for over 12 months. Crew of the Greenpeace Flagship the Rainbow Warrior took action against Tegel and their major customer KFC during the summer.(2) As a result KFC made a commitment to go GE free earlier this year.

“Tegel, the largest company selling chickens, is leading the way for the poultry industry and should be congratulated for their GE free stance. Tegel has around 60 percent of the market share and an annual turnover exceeding $60 Million. Inghams and other poultry producers should follow this lead and make a GE free commitment also,” said Cotter.

“Greenpeace is calling on the government to follow the example set by Tegel in listening to the people of New Zealand and ensure that our environment remains free from GE contamination. Tegels own statistics show that 75% of consumers are supportive of their GE free commitment. GE is simply not wanted by a clear majority of New Zealanders.”

Tegel joins a wave of companies both in New Zealand and in Europe that have listened to their customers and made a GE free commitment. Other companies who have also done so include, Heinz Watties, Cerebos Greggs, and Unilever. (1)

Ends


© Scoop Media

 
 
 
Business Headlines | Sci-Tech Headlines

 

ScoopPro: Helping The Education Sector Get More Out Of Scoop

The ScoopPro professional license includes a suite of useful information tools for professional users of Scoop including some specifically for those in the education sector to make your Scoop experience better. More>>

Big Tax Bill Due: Destiny Church Charities Deregistered

The independent Charities Registration Board has decided to remove Destiny International Trust and Te Hahi o Nga Matamua Holdings Limited from the Charities Register on 20 December 2017 because of the charities’ persistent failure to meet their annual return obligations. More>>

57 Million Users' Data: Uber Breach "Utterly Preventatable"

Cybersecurity leader Centrify says the Uber data breach of 57 million customer and driver records - which the ride-hailing company hid for more than a year - was “utterly preventable”. More>>

Scoop 3.0: How You Can Help Scoop’s Evolution

We have big plans for 2018 as we look to expand our public interest journalism coverage, upgrade our publishing infrastructure and offer even more valuable business tools to commercial users of Scoop. More>>

Having A Cow? Dairy Product Prices Slide For Fourth Straight Auction

Dairy product prices fell at the Global Dairy Trade auction, retreating for the fourth straight auction amid signs of increased production... Whole milk powder fell 2.7 percent to US$2,778 a tonne. More>>

ALSO:

Statistics: Butter At Record $5.67/Block; High Vegetable Prices

Rising dairy prices have pushed food prices up 2.7 percent in the year to October 2017, Stats NZ said today. This followed a 3.0 percent increase in the year to September 2017. More>>

ALSO:

Science: New Research Finds Herbicides Cause Antibiotic Resistance

New University of Canterbury research confirms that the active ingredients of the commonly used herbicides, RoundUp, Kamba and 2,4-D (glyphosate, dicamba and 2,4-D, respectively), each alone cause antibiotic resistance at concentrations well below label application rates. More>>

ALSO:

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
  • Bill Bennett on Tech