Video | Business Headlines | Internet | Science | Scientific Ethics | Technology | Search

 

A duty of care - animals used in research

23 July 2003

A duty of care

Care of animals used in research, testing, or teaching goes way beyond meeting their basic needs, says Wyn Hoadley, Chairperson of the National Animal Ethics Advisory Committee (NAEAC) in the 2002 Annual Report released today.

Mrs Hoadley was highlighting two publications produced by the committee to assist scientists, teachers and technicians in ensuring the welfare of animals in their care.

The guide – A Culture of Care – explores the notion of a ‘duty of care’ which Mrs Hoadley says requires a genuine commitment to the welfare of animals, a respect for the contribution they make to the work of scientists, researchers, and teachers, and a commitment to their wellbeing beyond the minimum standard.

“The concept is based on the universally accepted principles of replacement, reduction and refinement (the three Rs) which are the cornerstone of modern research and teaching practice involving animals.”

“It is the responsibility of the researcher to anticipate any potentially adverse effects of their work with animals and take all steps to avoid or minimise pain and distress,” she says.

The committee has also produced the Good Practice Guide for the Use of Animals in Research, Testing and Teaching which encompasses all aspects of care and use of animals for scientific purposes in medicine, biology, agriculture, veterinary and other animal sciences, industry and teaching. The guide supports the general procedures outlined in the Guide on Codes of Ethical Conduct.

NAEAC also hosted a series of workshops and meetings with various Animal Ethics Committees around the country to assist members in undertaking their responsibilities under the Animal Welfare Act 1999.

Mrs Hoadley said these meetings are invaluable for gaining a sense of how the Animal Welfare Act is being implemented in the area of animal research, testing and teaching, and also provides an important feedback mechanism in how NAEAC can fully support Animal Ethics Committees.

A copy of the report is available at: http://www.maf.govt.nz/biosecurity/naeac-ar-02.pdf

ENDS

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
Business Headlines | Sci-Tech Headlines

 

Voluntary Administration: Renaissance Brewing Up For Sale

Renaissance Brewing, the first local company to raise capital through equity crowdfunding, is up for sale after cash flow woes and product management issues led to the appointment of voluntary administrators. More>>

Elsewhere:

Approval: Northern Corridor Decision Released

The approval gives the green light to construction of the last link of Auckland’s Western Ring Route, providing an alternative route from South Auckland to the North Shore. More>>

ALSO:

Media Mega Merger: Full Steam Ahead For Appeal

New Zealand's two largest news publishers have confirmed they are committed to pursuing their appeal against the Commerce Commission's rejection of the proposal to merge their operations. More>>

Crown Accounts: $4.1 Billion Surplus

The New Zealand Government has achieved its third fiscal surplus in a row with the Crown accounts for the year ended 30 June 2017 showing an OBEGAL surplus of $4.1 billion, $2.2 billion stronger than last year, Finance Minister Steven Joyce says. More>>

ALSO:

Mycoplasma Bovis: One New Property Tests Positive

The newly identified property... was already under a Restricted Place notice under the Biosecurity Act. More>>

Accounting Scandal: Suspension Of Fuji Xerox From All-Of-Government Contract

General Manager of New Zealand Government Procurement John Ivil says, “FXNZ has been formally suspended from the Print Technology and Associated Services (PTAS) contract and terminated from the Office Supplies contract.” More>>