Video | Business Headlines | Internet | Science | Scientific Ethics | Technology | Search

 


World records and endangered squid

7 October 2004

World-record attempt to highlight plight of endangered squid

An attempt to break the world record for keeping squid alive will highlight the plight of the endangered animals to thousands across the world, says world-renowned squid expert, Dr Steve O'Shea.

A Senior Research Fellow at the Auckland University of Technology, Dr O'Shea is monitoring the progress of an egg sack of broad squid larvae suspended in a tank, which is located in Auckland University of Technology's School of Applied Sciences.

The tank is monitored by a movable web-cam and can be viewed live at www.squidcam.info. The squidcam is part of the Science Site, a unique science news site, which promotes science to teenagers and has had 18,400 visitors over the past year. The site can be accessed at www.thesciencesite.info

Dr O'Shea currently holds the world record for keeping deep-sea squid alive in captivity (120 days) and is working on improving the techniques for doing this.

"By finding out how these squid live in captivity in terms of their behaviour, what their dietary needs are, as well as the optimum tank conditions for keeping them alive, we will be one step closer to the ultimate aim of the experiment raising giant squid in captivity."

Dr O'Shea says that although little is known about cephalopods (octopus and squid), the activities of commercial fisheries are destroying the environment in which they live.

"The activities of commercial fisheries in New Zealand waters and across the world are not only depleting fishing stocks but also destroying the habitat of a wide variety of cephalopod species.

"Tragically, many are yet to be discovered and some are likely to become extinct even before they are known to science. Five species of squid and octopus endemic to New Zealand waters are critically endangered and facing imminent extinction - four of these were only discovered as recently as 1999."

To help public understanding of the giant squid's plight, Dr O'Shea invites members of the public to view and if they wish, touch the largest Giant Squid ever discovered.

The near 300 kg specimen that washed up on Farewell Spit earlier this year, is being stored by Dr O'Shea at Auckland University of Technology, and will be available to the public to view or if they wish to touch. Dr O'Shea will then give a lecture on new developments in squid research and conservation.

What? Public viewing of world's largest squid & lecture on new developments in squid research and conservation.

Where? Lecture theatre WS 114 - ground floor Faculty of Science and Engineering building, St Paul's Street, Auckland University of Technology Wellesley Street Campus.

When? Monday 11th October squid viewing 5-6:30pm - public lecture 7-8pm

ENDS


© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Business Headlines | Sci-Tech Headlines

 

Sky City : Auckland Convention Centre Cost Jumps By A Fifth

SkyCity Entertainment Group, the casino and hotel operator, is in talks with the government on how to fund the increased cost of as much as $130 million to build an international convention centre in downtown Auckland, with further gambling concessions ruled out. The Auckland-based company has increased its estimate to build the centre to between $470 million and $530 million as the construction boom across the country drives up building costs and design changes add to the bill.
More>>

ALSO:

RMTU: Mediation Between Lyttelton Port And Union Fails

The Rail and Maritime Union (RMTU) has opted to continue its overtime ban indefinitely after mediation with the Lyttelton Port of Christchurch (LPC) failed to progress collective bargaining. More>>

Earlier:

Science Policy: Callaghan, NSC Funding Knocked In Submissions

Callaghan Innovation, which was last year allocated a budget of $566 million over four years to dish out research and development grants, and the National Science Challenges attracted criticism in submissions on the government’s draft national statement of science investment, with science funding largely seen as too fragmented. More>>

ALSO:

Scoop Business: Spark, Voda And Telstra To Lay New Trans-Tasman Cable

Spark New Zealand and Vodafone, New Zealand’s two dominant telecommunications providers, in partnership with Australian provider Telstra, will spend US$70 million building a trans-Tasman submarine cable to bolster broadband traffic between the neighbouring countries and the rest of the world. More>>

ALSO:

More:

Statistics: Current Account Deficit Widens

New Zealand's annual current account deficit was $6.1 billion (2.6 percent of GDP) for the year ended September 2014. This compares with a deficit of $5.8 billion (2.5 percent of GDP) for the year ended June 2014. More>>

ALSO:

Still In The Red: NZ Govt Shunts Out Surplus To 2016

The New Zealand government has pushed out its targeted return to surplus for a year as falling dairy prices and a low inflation environment has kept a lid on its rising tax take, but is still dangling a possible tax cut in 2017, the next election year and promising to try and achieve the surplus pledge on which it campaigned for election in September. More>>

ALSO:

Job Insecurity: Time For Jobs That Count In The Meat Industry

“Meat Workers face it all”, says Graham Cooke, Meat Workers Union National Secretary. “Seasonal work, dangerous jobs, casual and zero hours contracts, and increasing pressure on workers to join non-union individual agreements. More>>

ALSO:

Get More From Scoop

 
 
Standards New Zealand

Standards New Zealand
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Sci-Tech
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news