Video | Business Headlines | Internet | Science | Scientific Ethics | Technology | Search

 


Powerful electron microscopes to be unveiled

MEDIA RELEASE 1 December 2004

Powerful electron microscopes to be unveiled by Minister

Two state-of-the art electron microscopes - capable of magnifying samples up to one million times and powerful enough to see atoms - will be officially opened by the Associate Minister of Education (Tertiary), the Hon Steve Maharey, at Victoria University on Thursday (2 December).

The MacDiarmid Institute for Advanced Materials and Nanotechnology has purchased two electron microscopes, each with different applications, in order to carry out analysis of materials specimens at a world-class level. The microscopes are worth more than $1 million each and were funded by the Government through its 2002 capital grant to the Institute, which is one of New Zealand’s seven Centres of Research Excellence.

Director of the Institute, Professor Paul Callaghan, says electron microscopes are a key platform tool and give researchers “fantastic information” about the samples they study.

“Early scientists found that optical microscopes were ultimately restrained by the wavelength of light. This limited what could be observed. After the discovery of electrons, around 70 years ago, it was realised that microscopes with a greater resolution were possible using a beam of electrons rather than a beam of light.

“Electron microscopes are the primary tool for the analysis and characterisation of materials specimens. They enable us to carry out work that was either extremely difficult or impossible in the past. The two new electron microscopes that we have bought are already proving to be a tremendous boost to the scientific community.”

The scanning electron microscope is being widely used by MacDiarmid Institute researchers from six of its seven partner institutions around New Zealand. The transmission electron microscope has just arrived and is already in demand.

Victoria University chemistry students have also been taking advantage of the powerful microscopes during their research projects, and groups of local high school pupils have had sessions with the equipment - introducing future scientists to a very visual and exciting part of physical science.

The MacDiarmid Institute (www.macdiarmid.ac.nz) is New Zealand's premier research organisation concerned with high quality research and research education in materials science and nanotechnology. More information is available at

ENDS

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Business Headlines | Sci-Tech Headlines

 

Scoop Business: NZ Govt Operating Deficit Smaller Than Expected

The New Zealand’s government’s operating deficit was smaller than expected in the first five months of the financial year as a clampdown on expenditure managed to offset a shortfall in the tax-take from last month’s forecast. More>>

ALSO:

0.8 Percent Annually:
NZ Inflation Falls Below RBNZ's Target

New Zealand's annual pace of inflation slowed to below the Reserve Bank's target band in the final three months of the year, giving governor Graeme Wheeler more room to keep the benchmark interest rate lower for longer.More>>

ALSO:

NASA, NOAA: Find 2014 Warmest Year In Modern Record

Since 1880, Earth’s average surface temperature has warmed by about 1.4 degrees Fahrenheit (0.8 degrees Celsius), a trend that is largely driven by the increase in carbon dioxide and other human emissions into the planet’s atmosphere. The majority of that warming has occurred in the past three decades. More>>

ALSO:

Scoop Business: New Zealand’s Reserve Bank Named Central Bank Of The Year

The Reserve Bank of New Zealand’s efforts to stifle house price inflation by using new policy tools has seen the institution named Central Bank of the year by Central Banking Publications, a publisher specialising in global central banking practice. More>>

ALSO:

Science Media Centre: Viral Science And Another 'Big Dry'?

"Potentially, if there is no significant rainfall for the next month or so, we could be heading into one of the worst nation-wide droughts we’ve seen for some time," warns NIWA principal climate scientist Dr Andrew Tait. More>>

ALSO:

Get More From Scoop

 
 
Standards New Zealand

Standards New Zealand
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Sci-Tech
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news