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Your Alcohol Habits Revealed Using A Tuft Of Hair

Your Alcohol Habits Revealed Using A Tuft Of Hair

The NZ Drug detection Agency Ltd is delighted to announce a revolutionary analysis service that reveals someone’s history of alcohol abuse over many months, and then tracks their treatment. The service, developed by scientists in Britain and Germany, will be offered by The NZ Drug Detection Agency Ltd (NZDDA) in conjunction with Surescreen Diagnostics (U.K) to clinics, treatment centres and law practices all over New Zealand and Australasia.

Alcohol has just been classified as the fifth most seriously harming drug, after only heroin, cocaine, barbiturates and street methadone. In 2005, 19% of men and 8% of women were classed as ‘heavy drinkers’.

Even more shocking is the fact that liver disease is the fifth highest cause of death in Britain. Alcoholics are just as prevalent in society as diabetics. Before today, it has just not been possible to check on someone’s previous long term alcohol abuse. For full details view www.nzdda.co.nz

How is it done?
As the hair grows, it absorbs special markers called fatty acid ethyl esters (FAEE’s) and ethyl glucuronide (EtG) into its structure, which remain in the hair indefinitely. These patented markers are only produced when there is alcohol in the bloodstream, and the more markers there are, the more alcohol you have consumed. What makes this analysis revolutionary is that it gives a history going back month by month or even years if required. No other method can do this. Afterwards, an alcoholic’s treatment can be monitored periodically as their hair grows.

What are the benefits of knowing someone’s alcohol history?

• Identify long-term alcohol addicts, offer help and improve treatment
success rate

• Prove a parent is fit to have custody of their children

• Identify an alcohol abuser in a safety critical job

• For forensic use, e.g. to prove whether a driver in a road accident was or
was not in the habit of overindulging alcohol. (example: Princess Diana’s
chauffeur, Henri Paul)

• To prove someone does not have an alcohol problem and is fit to lead (for
example running a political party, or head of a corporate business – all hair
colours are suitable)

• To prove someone is long-term abstinent and a suitable candidate for a
liver transplant.

ENDS

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