Video | Business Headlines | Internet | Science | Scientific Ethics | Technology | Search

 

Proposals threaten to stop good science - LSN

Proposals threaten to stop good science - LSN


Tough new rules proposed by Cabinet to restrict the use of genetically modified organisms threaten to emasculate the Environmental Risk Management Authority and stop good science in its tracks, the chairman of the Life Sciences Network, Dr William Rolleston said today.

“The government is considering new rules regarding the management of GMOs which is a result of their cooperation agreement with the Greens. The rules, including increased public disclosure, a prescriptive segregation and traceability regime, and mandatory labelling will increase compliance costs for little benefit. The proposed strict liability regime will destroy innovation at a time when it is needed to increase food and crop production in the face of global warming and world population increases.

“Most worryingly the proposals recommend changes to the legislation allowing the Minister for the Environment to direct ERMA to make specific controls a mandatory requirement of any approval. Present legislation prohibits this.

“ERMA is the body established to assess the use of GMOs and is charged with setting controls to mitigate risk. ERMA must take a cautionary approach and base its decisions on sound science. What makes the Minister think he is more scientifically capable than ERMA?

GM crops have been used for more than a decade and by 2007, there were 55 million farmers in 23 countries growing GM crops on 114.3 million hectares without any incident of environmental damage or harm to human health attributable to genetic modification. The proposed rules are unnecessary, threaten scientific progress in New Zealand and send a dangerous message that the government believes safety is determined by politics not science,”concluded Dr Rolleston.

ENDS


© Scoop Media

 
 
 
Business Headlines | Sci-Tech Headlines

 

Ground Rules: Government Moves To Protect Best Growing Land

“Continuing to grow food in the volumes and quality we have come to expect depends on the availability of land and the quality of the soil. Once productive land is built on, we can’t use it for food production, which is why we need to act now.” More>>

ALSO:

Royal Society: Calls For Overhaul Of Gene-Technology Regulations

An expert panel considering the implications of new technologies that allow much more controlled and precise ‘editing’ of genes, has concluded it’s time for an overhaul of the regulations and that there’s an urgent need for wide discussion and debate about gene editing... More>>

ALSO:

Retail: Card Spending Dips In July

Seasonally-adjusted electronic card spending dipped in July by 0.1 percent after being flat in June, according to Stats NZ. Economists had expected a 0.5 percent lift, according to the median in a Bloomberg poll. More>>

ALSO:

Product Stewardship: Govt Takes More Action To Reduce Waste

The Government is proposing a new way to deal with environmentally harmful products before they become waste, including plastic packing and bottles, as part of a wider plan to reduce the amount of rubbish ending up in landfills. More>>

ALSO:

Earnings Update: Fonterra Sees Up To $675m Loss On Writedowns

“While the Co-op’s FY19 underlying earnings range is within the current guidance of 10-15 cents per share, when you take into consideration these likely write-downs, we expect to make a reported loss of $590-675 million this year, which is a 37 to 42 cent loss per share." More>>

ALSO: