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NIWA - National Climate Summary – Winter 2008

NATIONAL CLIMATE CENTRE


Wednesday 3 September 2008

National Climate Summary – Winter 2008: Very stormy and wet with floods and snow to low levels

- Rainfall: Well above normal for north and west of North Island and eastern South Island
- Temperature: Above average in the north and west, below average in coastal Otago
- Sunshine: Above normal for much of the North Island, Fiordland and Southland

Winter 2008 was very wet and stormy in many areas, with frequent extremes. Significant flood-producing rainfall events occurred in Northland, Coromandel, and the Bay of Plenty, and twice in Marlborough. Wanganui, Manawatu, Marlborough, and parts of the central Plateau and Wellington had their wettest winters on record. Damaging windstorms occurred in the north of the North Island and August snow storms fell to unusually low levels in some places. In contrast, winter was comparatively benign in South Westland and Fiordland.

Winter rainfall was over 200 percent (double) of normal in Marlborough and Canterbury and about 150 percent (one and a half times) normal in Auckland, Waikato, Bay of Plenty, Taranaki, Manawatu, Wellington, northern parts of the Southern Alps, and coastal Otago. Not only were the rainfall totals far above normal for these locations, the number of days with rain was also much higher than average, particularly during July (23 days of rain in Kaitaia and New Plymouth, 22 in Auckland and Pukekohe, and 20 in Wellington). Gisborne, Hawkes Bay and Westland received about normal rainfall for winter, while parts of Fiordland and central Otago received about 75 percent (three quarters) of normal rainfall.

Winter overall was slightly warmer than average in parts of northern New Zealand, central Otago and Fiordland, and below average in eastern Otago and the Wairarapa. The national average temperature of 8.5 °C was 0.2 °C above average for winter. June saw a mild start to winter with much warmer than average conditions in many places especially inland South Canterbury and Otago, with temperatures 1.5 to 2°C above average. Average daily maximum temperatures during June were between 2 and 3 °C above average in these same areas. July was also generally warmer than average overall, and only slightly cooler than June, despite a cold spell which saw frosts as far north as Auckland and -9.1°C in Waiouru (a record low July minimum temperature for this location) in the second week of the month. August temperatures were near average in the North Island but below average in the South Island. The three days from the 9th to the 11th were particularly cold for many locations, with minimum temperatures as low as -5.0°C recorded at Dunedin Airport, -4.0°C at Martinborough and 1.5°C at Kaitaia (all August records). The overall winter climate pattern was dominated by more depressions (‘lows’) crossing central New Zealand and often centred to the east, with more frequent south easterly flows over the southern South Island, and westerlies over the North Island.

Major Highlights:

- Winter produced several high rainfall/flood-producing events. On 26 July heavy rainfall in Northland and Coromandel (166 mm was recorded in Paeroa, the highest ever 1-day total for July since 1914) caused severe flooding. A few days later on 29 July, heavy rainfall caused more flooding, slips and damage in Thames/Coromandel, Auckland, Nelson and Marlborough, with a North Shore home completely destroyed by a slip and another 14 homes at risk.

- More severe flooding occurred on 26 August, when 126 mm of rain fell in the 24 hours to 9am on the 26th at Kaikoura (the second highest 1-day August rainfall for this location since 1898) resulting in several landslides, damage and death of many livestock.

- The highest temperature during winter 2008 was 23.1°C recorded at Waipara West on the 15th of June. This was only 0.9°C below the record South Island temperature for June of 24.0°C recorded at Kaikoura and Temuka on 2 June 1976.

- The lowest temperature during winter was recorded at Arthurs Pass on the 20th of August, where the minimum temperature was -9.5°C. In July, there were freezing temperatures across the country on the 9th, with negative numbers recorded from Auckland (-1°C) to Queenstown (-4°C). The unusual sight of frost in Auckland was seen for two days in a row on the 8th and 9th.

- Windstorms struck Northland and Auckland on 26 July bringing down powerlines and trees, leaving 53,000 homes without power in the Auckland region.

- There were two major snowfall events in winter. The first occurred on 15 August bringing snow to unusually low levels in the north west of the South Island. Three days later on 18 August, snow fell to very low levels in the North Island, with over 1 m of snow at Ruapehu village.

- Of the five main centres, Auckland was the warmest, Wellington the wettest and sunniest, and Dunedin was the driest. Winter temperatures were near or slightly above average at all five locations. Rainfall was well above normal in Auckland and Christchurch, above normal in Hamilton and Wellington, and near normal in Dunedin. Winter sunshine was near normal everywhere.

Rainfall: Winter rainfall was over 200 percent (double) of normal in Marlborough and Canterbury and about 150 percent (one and a half times) normal in Auckland, Waikato, Bay of Plenty, Taranaki, Manawatu, Wellington, northern parts of the Southern Alps, and coastal Otago. Gisborne, Hawkes Bay and Westland received about normal rainfall for winter, while parts of Fiordland and central Otago received about 75 percent (three quarters) of normal rainfall.
Temperature: Seasonal mean temperatures were about 0.5 °C above average in western parts of Northland, Taranaki and Fiordland and more than 1.0 °C above average in parts of Central Otago. They were below average by about 0.5°C in the southeast of the North Island and eastern Otago.
Sunshine: Winter sunshine hours were at least 110 percent of normal in Northland, Waikato, Bay of Plenty, Gisborne, Hawkes Bay, Wellington and southwestern South Island. In Taranaki, Manawatu, Westland and coastal Otago totals were lower than usual, being 90 percent of normal.


RAINFALL: WELL ABOVE NORMAL FOR MUCH OF COUNTRY

Winter rainfall was over 200 percent (double) of normal in Marlborough and Canterbury and about 150 percent (one and a half times) normal in Auckland, Waikato, Bay of Plenty, Taranaki, Manawatu, Wellington, northern parts of the Southern Alps, and coastal Otago. Gisborne, Hawkes Bay and Westland received about normal rainfall for winter, while in contrast parts of Fiordland and central Otago received about 75 percent (three quarters) of normal rainfall.

Near or record winter rainfall totals were recorded at:

Location Winter 2008
rainfall
(mm) Percentage
of normal Year
Records began Comments
Kaitaia Observatory 574 122 1985 4th highest
Warkworth 732 142 1966 2nd highest
Paeroa 717 176 1914 Highest
Auckland Aero 541 149 1959 3rd highest
Pukekohe 649 166 1944 Highest
Whatawhata (Waikato) 879 174 1952 2nd highest
Ruakura 546 148 1905 3rd highest
Taumarunui 622 146 1913 2nd highest
Turangi 714 154 1968 2nd highest
New Plymouth 675 162 1944 3rd highest
Paraparaumu Aero 484 163 1945 2nd highest
Palmerston North 411 164 1928 4th highest
Levin 450 145 1895 Highest
Wallaceville 666 165 1924 Highest
Stratford 870 148 1960 2nd highest
Ohakune 692 181 1961 Highest
Waiouru 556 191 1950 Highest
Wanganui 369 154 1987 2nd highest
Greymouth Aero 817 134 1947 3rd highest
Blenheim Aero 376 174 1927 Highest
Hanmer Forest 691 202 1905 Highest
Kaikoura 550 229 1898 Highest
Culverden 346 194 1921 4th highest
Darfield 362 168 1919 2nd highest
Christchurch Aero 352 177 1863 4th highest
Lumsden 210 103 1982 4th highest

Milford Sound 826 64 1929 4th lowest

TEMPERATURE: ABOVE AVERAGE IN THE NORTH AND WEST OF NORTH ISLAND, FIORDLAND AND CENTRAL OTAGO; BELOW AVERAGE IN EASTERN AREAS

Seasonal mean temperatures were about 0.5 °C above average in western parts of Northland, Taranaki and Fiordland and more than 1.0 °C above average in parts of Central Otago. They were below average by about 0.5°C in the southeast of the North Island and eastern Otago. The national average temperature of 8.5 °C was 0.2 °C above average for winter.

Extreme (high and low) winter mean daily air temperatures were recorded at:

Location Mean air temperature (°C) Departure from normal Year
records began Comments
Kaikohe 12.0 0.8 1973 3rd highest
Dargaville 12.4 0.8 1943 3rd highest
Kumeu (Waitakere) 11.4 0.9 1978 2nd highest
Milford Sound 6.9 1.1 1934 3rd highest
Cromwell 5.7 1.9 1949 Highest

Dannevirke 7.0 -1.1 1951 4th lowest
Balclutha 4.2 -1.7 1964 Lowest


Extreme (high and low) winter mean maximum daily air temperatures were recorded at:

Location Mean maximum air temperature (°C) Departure from normal Year
records began Comments
Kaikohe 14.8 0.7 1973 3rd highest
Waipawa 13.4 0.8 1945 3rd highest
Milford Sound 11.1 1.2 1934 Highest
Appleby 13.9 1.1 1943 2nd highest
Cromwell 10.8 1.9 1949 Highest

Dannevirke 10.7 -1.3 1951 Lowest
Castlepoint 12.3 -0.7 1972 3rd lowest
Balclutha 8.3 -1.7 1964 Lowest


Extreme (high and low) winter mean minimum daily air temperatures were recorded at:

Location Mean minimum air temperature (°C) Departure from normal Year
records began Comments
Kaitaia 9.7 1.0 1967 4th highest
Kaikohe 9.1 0.9 1973 4th highest
Dargaville 9.4 1.9 1943 3rd highest
Kumeu (Waitakere) 7.3 1.4 1978 Highest
Paeroa 7.1 1.8 1947 4th highest
Paraparaumu Aero 6.5 1.2 1953 2nd highest
Hawera 6.2 1.1 1977 3rd highest
Wanganui 7.2 0.9 1987 4th highest
Cape Campbell 7.6 2.9 1953 2nd highest
Darfield 2.8 1.3 1939 Highest
Tara Hills -1.0 1.1 1949 3rd highest
Cromwell 0.6 1.8 1949 2nd highest
Gore 1.9 0.4 1971 Highest

Dunedin Aero 0.7 0.3 1947 2nd lowest
Balclutha 0.1 -1.5 1964 Lowest


SUNSHINE: ABOVE NORMAL IN NORTH AND EAST OF NORTH ISLAND, FIORDLAND AND SOUTHLAND

Winter sunshine hours were at least 110 percent of normal in Northland, Waikato, Bay of Plenty, Gisborne, Hawkes Bay, Wellington and southwestern South Island. In Taranaki, Manawatu, Westland and coastal Otago totals were lower than usual, being 90 percent of normal.

Extreme (high and low) winter sunshine hours were recorded at:

Location August
sunshine (hours) Percentage
of normal Year
records began Comments
Waipawa 449 120 1945 3rd highest
Cromwell 381 116 1979 3rd highest
Balclutha 334 115 1964 4th highest

Mt Cook 211 83 1930 3rd lowest

WINTER CLIMATE IN THE FIVE MAIN CENTRES

Of the five main centres, Auckland was the warmest, Wellington the wettest and sunniest (just), and Dunedin was the driest. Winter temperatures were near or slightly above average in all five locations. Rainfall was well above normal in Auckland and Christchurch, above normal in Hamilton and Wellington, and near normal in Dunedin. Autumn sunshine was near normal everywhere.

Location Winter
Mean
Temp.
(°C) Dep.
from normal
(°C) Winter
rainfall
(mm) % of
normal Winter Sunshine
(hours) % of
normal
Aucklanda 11.4 +0.0 Near average 576 150 Well above normal 375 98 Near normal
Hamilton 9.6 +0.6 Above average 536 149 Above normal 368c 102 Near
normal
Wellington 9.6 +0.4 Near average 593 146 Above
normal 376 107 Near normal
Christchurchb 6.5 +0.1 Near average 352 177 Well above normal 361 92 Near normal
Dunedin 7.2 +0.2 Near
average 232 112 Normal 315 104 Near normal
a Mangere b Christchurch Airport c Ruakura


HIGHLIGHTS AND EXTREME EVENTS

 High rainfall
29 June: 40 to 50 mm of rain in Wellington and the Hutt Valley up to 5 pm on the 29th produced some local flooding of roads, with slips closing Paekakariki Hill road.
9 July: The area around Mt Taranaki received 100mm of rain in the 24 hours to 6am on the 9th, and 60mm also fell in Milford Sound. Lower Hutt received 26mm of rain between 4am and 6am on the 9th.
11 July: 32mm of rain fell within a few hours at Nelson airport on the morning of the 11th and even heavier rains may have come down in the surrounding hills. A large slip on Rocks Road, SH6 was cleared enough to allow cars through by the afternoon. The heavy rain and flooding in Nelson caused sewage to overflow into the harbour.
26 July: A river burst its banks on the 26th near the township of Panguru, on the northern side of Hokianga Harbour, and up to 35 people had been evacuated and roads throughout Northland were closed by flooding. The Kauaeranga River in the Coromandel also broke its banks and flooded the highway.
29 July: More than 160mm of rain fell in parts of the Coromandel overnight on the 29th resulting in parts of Hikuai and Pauanui on State Highway 25 being under more than a metre of water. The Karangahake Gorge SH2 between Paeroa and Waihi was flooded with water about 30cm deep, SH25 south of Whitianga was flooded with water 1m deep and unpassable, and Kaihikatea Road Dairy Flat was flooded. Slips and downed trees caused closures of several other roads. One North Shore home has been completely destroyed in a slip, with another 14 homes at risk. Tauranga and the Western Bay of Plenty received approximately 45mm of rain from 9pm on the 29th to 5pm on the 30th. Whakatane received around 22mm of rain and Rotorua received approximately 14mm of rain in that time. A number of roads to the west of Gisborne were closed by surface flooding.
30 July: A state of emergency was declared by Marlborough District Council on the 30th due to extensive surface flooding. The storm knocked out an important water pipeline in Nelson. Picton police and volunteers sandbagged the waterfront in an effort to save the town from flooding. Severe flooding in the small South Island town of Sefton meant that 12 people had to be evacuated and spent the night in the local school hall.
2–3 August: Wellington City had more than 20 slips, causing road closures and property damage.
5 August: Huntly College was closed when the Waikato River flooded the school grounds. School pupils living on East Cape were prevented from travelling to school in Gisborne when storm damage blocked SH35 at Kemps Hill, north of Ruatoria. A temporary road was opened on 13 August.
26 August: Campers at Picton Camping Ground evacuated to spend the night in Queen Charlotte College. Queen Charlotte Drive was closed by numerous slips, and there was surface flooding south of Picton. Slips closed SH1 from Weld Pass, near Seddon, to Cheviot, and roads around Kaikoura were sandbagged after surface flooding. The main water pipe into Cheviot was broken cutting water supply to the town. Tank water needed for Amberley and other areas of Hurunui District after main supply affected. Mason River, a tributary of the Waiau River, burst its banks, putting the road under 4 m of water and isolating several houses. A raging Eyre River in north Canterbury claimed up to 100 dairy cows when a bridge approach was washed away. The settlement of Peketa, south of Kaikoura, was evacuated after the Kahutara River burst its banks. A road bridge in Blythes Valley, south of Cheviot, was swept away.
28 August: Wairarapa sewerage and storm-water systems affected by severe flooding, and forcing evacuation of homes in Masterton. Many roads in the area closed by flooding. High stock losses expected in new born lambs.

Near record high extreme 1-day rainfall totals for winter were recorded at:

Location Extreme 1-day rainfall
(mm) Date of extreme rainfall Year
Records
began Comments
Morrinsville 65 Jul 3rd 1978 2nd highest
North Egmont 446 Jul 11th 1981 Highest
Paeroa 166 Jul 26th 1914 2nd highest
Karangahake Gorge 135 Jul 29th 1981 2nd highest
Blenheim Aero 70 Jul 30th 1927 3rd equal highest
Grassmere Salt Works 127 Jul 30th 1943 Highest
Ward, Chancet 131 Jul 30th 1913 2nd highest
Kaikoura Plains 146 Jul 30th 1980 Highest
Waipara 131 Jul 30th 1923 2nd highest
Amberley 122 Jul 30th 1909 3rd highest
Rangiora 99 Jul 30th 1891 Highest

Hanmer Forest 135 Aug 25th 1905 2nd highest


 Temperature
The highest temperature during June 2008 was 23.1ºC recorded at Waipara West on the 15th, the highest June temperature on record at this location. This is only 0.9 ºC below the highest ever South Island June temperature of 24.0 recorded on 2 June 1976 at Kaikoura and Temuka.
The highest temperature during July 2008 was 22.0ºC recorded at Kaikoura on the 11th, the second equal highest July temperature on record (since 1964) at this location. The North Shore recorded 20.2°C on the 19th, which was the third highest July temperature at this location.
There were freezing temperatures across the country on the 9th of July, with negative numbers recorded from Auckland (-1°C) to Queenstown (-4°C). The unusual sight of frost in Auckland was seen for two days in a row on the 8th and 9th of July.
The highest temperature during August 2008 was 19.9°C recorded at Haast on the 26th during a strong easterly air flow. The minimum temperature of 12.9°C at Haast on the 25th was also the highest for the country for August. Both of these temperatures were the highest August temperatures (maximum and minimum) at this location since records began in 1949.
The coldest temperature during August was recorded at Arthurs Pass on the 20th, where the minimum temperature was -9.5°C. At lower elevations, Alexandra recorded -8.0°C on the 10th (the middle of three very cold days throughout the country – it got down to -7.0°C at Alexandra on the following day as well). Hanmer Forest also recorded -7.3°C on the 20th.
There were several record or near-record low daily maximum temperatures during August with Clyde only reaching 2.7°C (the maximum temperature for the day) on the 12th and Balclutha only creeping up to 3.0°C on the 16th (both of these were record low daily maxima for August).


Near record high extreme daily maximum air temperatures for winter were recorded at:

Location Extreme maximum
temperature
(ºC) Date of extreme temperature Year
Records
began Comments
Grassmere Salt Works 22.4 Jun 9th 1953 3rd highest
Mt Cook 19.0 Jun 15th 1929 4th highest
Waipara West 23.1 Jun 15th 1973 2nd highest
Le Bons Bay 21.2 Jun 15th 1984 Highest
Lake Tekapo 18.5 Jun 15th 1925 2nd equal highest
Wallaceville 19.4 Jun 15th 1939 3rd equal highest
Hawera 17.9 Jun 15th 1977 4th equal highest
Blenheim 21.3 Jun 15th 1941 2nd highest
Te Kuiti 20.0 Jun 16th 1959 3rd equal highest
Turangi 19.4 Jun 16th 1968 Highest
Lower Retaruke 19.6 Jun 16th 1966 3rd highest
Wanganui 20.0 Jun 16th 1987 Highest
Takaka 20.9 Jun 16th 1978 2nd equal highest
Westport Aero 19.0 Jun 16th 1937 Highest
Appleby 20.7 Jun 16th 1943 Highest

Haast 19.9 Aug 26th 1949 Highest
Milford Sound 17.8 Aug 26th 1934 3rd highest
Te Puke 19.8 Aug 27th 1973 4th equal highest
Lake Rotoiti 17.0 Aug 27th 1965 Highest

Near record low extreme daily minimum air temperatures for winter were recorded at:

Location Extreme minimum
temperature
(ºC) Date of extreme temperature Year
Records
began Comments
Blenheim Aero -6.1 Jun 18th 1932 2nd lowest
Cheviot -6.4 Jun 19th 1982 2nd equal lowest
Grassmere Salt Works -3.9 Jun 30th 1953 2nd equal lowest
Timaru -4.6 Jun 30th 1984 2nd lowest
Dunedin Aero -6.1 Jun 30th 1947 4th lowest

Whakatane Aero -3.5 Jul 6th 1975 2nd lowest
New Plymouth -2 Jul 6th 1944 3rd lowest
Waiouru -9.1 Jul 6th 1962 3rd lowest

Warkworth -0.3 Aug 9th 1966 2nd equal lowest
Port Taharoa 1.2 Aug 9th 1973 4th equal lowest
Kaitaia Observatory 1.5 Aug 10th 1985 3rd equal lowest
Arthurs Pass -9.5 Aug 19th 1973 3rd equal lowest
Martinborough -4 Aug 20th 1986 3rd equal lowest


 Snowfall
7 June: Snow fell from Southland to the Kaikoura coast on 7 June, with up to 20 cm lying in the Maniototo, snow flurries in Dunedin, and snow flakes in Christchurch closing the airport for a few hours. Porters Pass road closed.
24 June: Snow fell to 200 metres in Southland on 24 June, with snow and sleety conditions to low levels in the east of the South Island.
28 June: Snow closed roads around Ruapehu including the Desert Road on the 28th, after heavy snow fell on the Central Plateau.
5 July: Snow fell as far north as the Kaimai Ranges in the Waikato on the 5th while hail fell in Wanganui, Taranaki and Auckland on the same day. Sleet was reported in New Plymouth, Palmerston North and Wellington. Snow also fell in Queenstown (up to 18cm), Dunedin, Ashburton and Christchurch. Several roads were closed by snow or ice, including SH3 southeast of Hawera, the Napier-Taihape Rd, SH49 between Waiouru and Ohakune, SH1 between Rangipo and Waiouru, and several South Island roads including the main road to Akaroa.
26 July: Heavy snow on the 26th closed the Desert Rd and Napier to Taihape road in the central North Island.
31 July: Snow fell to depths of around 20cm in Temuka and elsewhere in inland Canterbury on the 31st.
4-6 August: Early August (4th – 6th) saw a brief but cold system bring snow to low elevations and close most alpine roads in the east and south of the South Island and the central parts of the North Island. Several ski fields recorded new snowfall totals exceeding 1 m over a 48 hour period.
9 August: Christchurch was blanketed in 2–5 cm of snow. This system moved north and closed the Rimutaka Hill road and Desert Road on the 10th.
15 August: A deep low brought heavy snow to the Southern Alps and the western and north western ranges. Arthur’s Pass received about 1m of snow, closing the road for 3 days, while Mt Cook Village received about 60 cm. This storm was particularly unique as snow fell to low levels (~100 m) on the western and north western side of the Southern Alps.
18 August: A cold southerly flow brought snow to Christchurch and closed roads on Banks Peninsula. The Rimutaka road out of Wellington was also blocked by snow and the Desert road was closed for several days. During this event over 1m of snow was recorded at Ruapehu village, with 15–20 cm down at the Château at Ruapehu. Snow was also recorded to very low levels in the North Island, with snow observed in Featherston and down to sea level at Paekakariki.


 High winds and tornadoes
7 June: High winds affected flights into Queenstown on 7 June, and brought trees down in Central Otago. Westerlies and north westerlies gusted up to 110 km/h at Gore, 120 km/h at Kelburn and 170 km/h at Castlepoint.
18 June: The highest wind gust for the month was 183 km/h at Hicks Bay on the 18th.
22 June: A mini-tornado damaged properties in Papamoa near Tauranga on 22nd June in blustery northerlies, damaging the roofs of three homes in one street.
24-27 June: Strong cold southwesterlies gusted to 124 km/h at Awakino (Taranaki) and 100 km/h in Auckland on the 24th. Very blustery westerlies and southwesterlies produced gusts up to 147 km/h at Awakino on the 26th, 132 km/h at Manukau Heads and 133 km/h at Cape Reinga on the 27th.
29 June: Strong southerlies brought winds gusting as high as 148 km/h in the Wellington region on the 29th, causing 7 m swells in Cook Strait, cancelling interisland ferries and regional flights in and out of Wellington Airport.
6 July: Gale force winds in the Cook Strait led to the cancellation of interisland ferry services on the 6th and strong winds in Christchurch also blew down several power poles.
8 July: Wind gusts along the east coasts of the North and South Islands reached 120 km/hr overnight on the 8th.
22 July: High winds on the 22nd damaged property in the Taranaki region. There were also reports of a small tornado in coastal Taranaki. Along Auckland's west coast gusts reached 105 km/hr.
23 July: Wind gusts of between 100 km/hr and 110 km/hr buffeted both the Hauraki Gulf and Manukau Heads on the 23rd. Further south, at Golden Valley west of Tauranga, gusts of up to 100 km/hr were recorded.
26 July: Northland experienced wind gusts of up to 174 km/hr on the 26th bringing down trees and power lines as the storm made landfall. Thousands of homes were without power in the region. Power was also cut to 53,000 homes in Rodney, Waitakere and the North Shore. There were another 7000 without power in Auckland in Howick, Otara, Clevedon, Mangere and parts of Waiheke Island. Gusts in Auckland Harbour reached 125 km/hr on the 26th. Hundreds of trees were brought down and several roofs were blown off by high winds in Te Aroha, in the eastern Waikato.
30 July: Winds of around 80km/hr hit Tauranga between 4am and 5am on the 30th and a tornado struck Tauranga and Mt Maunganui around 9am lifting roof tiles and smashing windows.
4 August: Property in Kimberley Road, Levin, was severely damaged when a mini-tornado struck in the early hours.
12 August: A double garage in Mt Maunganui lost its roof, and tiles were sheared off houses in several nearby streets.
19August: A ‘twister’ east of Opotiki brought down power lines, and electrocuted 16 in-calf cows. Two barns were brought down, hundreds of metres of fencing destroyed, and trees scattered. Nearby properties were also damaged.

Near record high extreme wind gusts for winter were recorded at:

Location Extreme wind gust speed
(km/hr) Date of extreme gust Year
Records
began Comments
Gore 111 Jun 6th 1987 3rd highest
Castlepoint 170 Jun 7th 1972 Highest
Queenstown Aero 89 Jun 7th 1972 4th equal highest
Hicks Bay 183 Jun 18th 1975 Highest
Turangi 95 Jun 26th 1973 2nd highest
Hamilton 91 Jun 27th 1978 4th highest

Cape Reinga 174 Jul 26th 1974 4th highest
Pukekohe 102 Jul 26th 1986 Highest
Hawera 91 Jul 26th 1986 4th highest
Levin 109 Jul 30th 1971 2nd highest
Nelson 119 Jul 30th 1972 Highest

ENDS

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