Video | Business Headlines | Internet | Science | Scientific Ethics | Technology | Search

 


World-first green technology has vast market potential

MEDIA RELEASE

December 8, 2010

Carbonscape Cracks One-Step Production of Activated Carbon From Waste

World-first green technology has vast market potential

BLENHEIM, NEW ZEALAND: New Zealand charcoal technology company Carbonscape has become the first in the world to pioneer a new green technology - a one-step process to cheaply produce highly porous charcoal.

Known as Activated Carbon (often described as AC), this form of charcoal has a huge surface area, typically measuring more than 500 square metres per gram.

This large surface area gives AC a diverse range of uses, including cleaning contaminated soil and water, and capturing significant amounts of carbon dioxide emissions from power stations.

Throughout the world AC is used in such diverse industries as metallurgy, chemistry, agriculture, timber processing, gold extraction, nuclear energy, pharmaceuticals, petrochemicals, medicine and food processing.

Traditionally, the method of production involves many stages of processing and uses relatively exotic materials to open up the tiny pores between carbon atoms. Using its patented continuous-flow microwave technology, Carbonscape™ has produced high-grade and highly-valuable AC in a single processing step using waste pine sawdust.

The company has now begun batch scale production at its South Island, New Zealand pilot site this month. Independent testing shows Carbonscape can produce surface areas of 800 square metres per gram from pine sawdust.

“We’re incredibly excited by this development,” says Carbonscape™ director and CEO Tim Langley, “We have replaced a slow and complex process using exotic materials with a fast, single process using pine sawdust and created a 60% improvement in quality. We have applied for patents. The potential world market for this technology is vast. Each year demand is rising by about 5%. It’s a whole new world.”

A benefit of Carbonscape’s solution is it can use wood and other waste that would otherwise be expensive to dispose of.

“Something that was a massive waste product can become a very valuable resource,” says Tim Langley.

Activated Carbon also has the potential to massively reduce the emissions from large, single sources of carbon dioxide, such as power stations. These sources currently produce some 60% of all carbon dioxide, providing the greatest near-term potential for reducing greenhouse gas emissions. Activated Carbon may help in the in the fight against climate change. By placing AC in flue gases, it can absorb carbon dioxide before it is released into the atmosphere.

“The is just the start”, explains Carbonscape™ director and University Professor Chris Turney, “We’re now exploring the potential of other waste types for producing Activated Carbon to identify whether they are best for absorbing carbon dioxide or for other applications. It’s an incredibly exciting time.”

“By combining waste wood streams and the dial-up capability of Carbonscape’s microwave technology, it is possible to generate different quantities of high-value charcoal, oil and gas byproducts”, comments Carbonscape™ director Nick Gerritsen, “This gives us remarkable flexibility, allowing us to optimise product generation.”

In 2008, Carbonscape received the Judge’s Top Choice in the Financial Times (UK) Climate Change Challenge.
www.carbonscape.com

ENDS

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Business Headlines | Sci-Tech Headlines

 

SOE Results: TVNZ Lifts Annual Profit 25% On Flat Ad Revenue, Quits Igloo

Television New Zealand, the state-owned broadcaster, lifted annual profit 25 percent, ahead of forecast and despite a dip in advertising revenue, while quitting its stake in the pay-TV Igloo joint venture with Sky Network Television. More>>

ALSO:

Insurers Up For More Payouts: Chch Property Investor Wins Policy Appeal In Supreme Court

Ridgecrest NZ, a property investor, has won an appeal in the Supreme Court over insurance cover provided by IAG New Zealand for a Christchurch building damaged in four successive earthquakes. More>>

ALSO:

Other Cases:

Royal Society: Review Finds Community Water Fluoridation Safe And Effective

A review of the scientific evidence for and against the efficacy and safety of fluoridation of public water supplies has found that the levels of fluoridation used in New Zealand create no health risks and provide protection against tooth decay. More>>

ALSO:

Scoop Business: Croxley Calls Time On NZ Production In Face Of Cheap Imports

Croxley Stationery, whose stationery brands include Olympic, Warwick and Collins, plans to cease manufacturing in New Zealand because it has struggled to compete with lower-cost imports in a market where the printed word is giving way to electronic communications. More>>

ALSO:

Prefu Roundup: Forecasts Revised, Surplus Intact

The National government heads into the election with its Budget surplus target broadly intact, delivering a set of economic and fiscal forecasts marginally revised from May to reflect weaker commodity prices and a lower tax take. More>>

ALSO:

Convention Centre: Major New SkyCity Hotel And Laneway For Auckland

Today SKYCITY Entertainment Group Limited revealed plans to build a new hotel and pedestrian laneway of bars, restaurants and boutique shopping on land it owns in the Nelson and Hobson Streets block, expanding the SKYCITY Entertainment Precinct. More>>

ALSO:

Get More From Scoop

 
 
Computer Power Plus

Standards New Zealand

Standards New Zealand
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Sci-Tech
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news