Video | Business Headlines | Internet | Science | Scientific Ethics | Technology | Search

 


Christchurch researchers get HRC funding


Embargoed until Wednesday July 20, 2011

Christchurch researchers get HRC funding

Professor David Fergusson of the University of Otago, Christchurch, and his team have been granted almost $4 million by the Health Research Council (HRC) to continue work on their world-renowned longitudinal study, including measuring the psychological toll of the Canterbury earthquakes.

Professor Fergusson’s Health and Development Study has been running for more than 30 years. Its findings have shaped Government policy and enlightened New Zealanders about the exact impact of childhood disadvantages on later life outcomes.


The HRC funding will allow Professor Fergusson and his team to study participants to age 35, across a range of measures. Information was first collected about participants, and their families, when they were infants.


Professor Fergusson says he will look at the consequences of the 2010 Canterbury earthquake for those study participants who experienced it. He will be able to compare outcomes for them with participants who were not in Canterbury at that time.


Other Christchurch research teams funded by the HRC include:


• Head of the University of Otago, Christchurch’s, Psychological Medicine department, Professor Roger Mulder was granted $726,684 for a study using modified cognitive behavioural treatment for non-cardiac chest pain. Chest pain is one of the most common reasons for presenting to emergency departments. But the majority of chest pain is not cardiac in origin. Current ways of dealing with this, such as reassurance, are not very effective. Professor Mulder will evaluate a brief psychosocial intervention to reduce distress, and teach coping skills, stress management and cardiac risk factor reduction to see if the intervention results in less use of health resources and better quality of life for patients.


• Associate Professor Marie Crowe from the Psychological Medicine department has been granted $1,189,961 to research the effectiveness of a Biopolar Disorder Clinic. The trial addresses a gap in mental health care for this group after they are released from specialist mental health services. The Biopolar Disorder Clinic focuses on a combination of psychotherapy and medication management. At the moment people with bipolar disorder normally have follow-up appointments with a GP except for acute instances.


• Associate Professor Lisa Stamp was granted $1,199,225 to study the safety and efficacy of increasing the recommended dose of the most commonly prescribed gout medication. There is evidence many patients fail to achieve adequate reduction in required blood urate levels, at recommended doses. Preliminary evidence shows increasing dose is safe and effective.


• Professor Mark Richards, head of the Christchurch Cardioendocrine Research Group, had his research funding extended ($3,430,492) so his team can continue work on the Hauora Manawa/Community Heart Study, a study into the prediction of onset and outcomes in coronary heart disease and research to develop a range of specific tests for acute cardiac injury.


• Associate Professor Margreet Vissers will receive $812,985 to study the impact of vitamin-C on cancerous tumour growth in an animal model.


ends

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Business Headlines | Sci-Tech Headlines

 

Scoop Business: NZ Dollar Falls To 3-Year Low As Investors Favour Greenback

The New Zealand dollar fell to its lowest in more than three years as investors sold euro and bought US dollars, weakening other currencies against the greenback. More>>

ALSO:

Scoop Business: NZ Govt Operating Deficit Smaller Than Expected

The New Zealand’s government’s operating deficit was smaller than expected in the first five months of the financial year as a clampdown on expenditure managed to offset a shortfall in the tax-take from last month’s forecast. More>>

ALSO:

0.8 Percent Annually:
NZ Inflation Falls Below RBNZ's Target

New Zealand's annual pace of inflation slowed to below the Reserve Bank's target band in the final three months of the year, giving governor Graeme Wheeler more room to keep the benchmark interest rate lower for longer.More>>

ALSO:

NASA, NOAA: Find 2014 Warmest Year In Modern Record

Since 1880, Earth’s average surface temperature has warmed by about 1.4 degrees Fahrenheit (0.8 degrees Celsius), a trend that is largely driven by the increase in carbon dioxide and other human emissions into the planet’s atmosphere. The majority of that warming has occurred in the past three decades. More>>

ALSO:

Scoop Business: New Zealand’s Reserve Bank Named Central Bank Of The Year

The Reserve Bank of New Zealand’s efforts to stifle house price inflation by using new policy tools has seen the institution named Central Bank of the year by Central Banking Publications, a publisher specialising in global central banking practice. More>>

ALSO:

Science Media Centre: Viral Science And Another 'Big Dry'?

"Potentially, if there is no significant rainfall for the next month or so, we could be heading into one of the worst nation-wide droughts we’ve seen for some time," warns NIWA principal climate scientist Dr Andrew Tait. More>>

ALSO:

Get More From Scoop

 
 
Standards New Zealand

Standards New Zealand
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Sci-Tech
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news