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BBC Presenter To Attend NZ International Science Festival

BBC Presenter To Attend NZ International Science Festival


Media release – Tuesday 8 May 2012


Popular British science presenter Prof Alice Roberts to attend science festival


New Zealand International Science Festival, 30 June to 8 July 2012

Alice Roberts, popular BBC presenter and professor of public engagement in science at the University of Birmingham, will attend this year’s eighth New Zealand International Science Festival. The festival will be held in Dunedin from 30 June to 8 July 2012.

After making her television debut as human bone specialist on Channel 4's Time Team, in 2001 Roberts went on to become a science presenter on BBC2, drawing on her expertise and passion for science, medicine and anthropology. In addition to being part of the original presenting team on BBC2's Coast, she has fronted several series and programmes including Don't Die Young, The Incredible Human Journey, Wild Swimming, Digging for Britain, Horizon ('Are we still evolving?'), and Origins of Us.

Prof Roberts has also written several popular science books. She enjoys art, producing original illustrations for Don't Die Young and The Incredible Human Journey, and advised on the anatomy artwork for another BBC2 show, The Complete Human Body.

She is excited by the opportunity to be part of the festival and admits this will be her first visit to Dunedin, New Zealand.

“I’ve been involved with the Cheltenham Festival of Science in the UK for many years, and I’ve heard about the New Zealand International Science Festival via colleagues. I’m very excited about being part of the festival line-up for 2012, and I’m looking forward to visiting Dunedin and sharing my passion for science and anthropology.”

New Zealand International Science Festival Director Chris Green said the festival team is delighted to have a science communicator of Prof Robert’s calibre on board for 2012.

“Having Professor Alice Roberts attend the festival as part of our international line-up will bring a different dimension to our programme of activities. Alice has a wealth of experience as a science presenter and her events will attract a wide range of audiences – through the use of art, public presentations and inspiring hands-on workshops.”

In keeping with the festival theme of ‘what makes us tick?’, Prof Roberts will present a public demonstration of anatomical body painting, with a focus on muscle anatomy and function. Other events in the festival programme include a kids’ workshop, ‘meet your skeleton’; a public talk on ‘the subject of human anatomy and evolution; a workshop for teens and adults exploring the theme of ‘skulls and teeth’; and a ‘women in science’ breakfast.

Details of ticket sales and other visiting experts are yet to be announced.
The British High Commission has made Prof Robert’s visit to the festival possible with their generous support.
The 2012 New Zealand International Science Festival is sponsored by major partners, the University of Otago and the Dunedin City Council.
Visit www.scifest.org.nz for more information.

Ends

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