Video | Business Headlines | Internet | Science | Scientific Ethics | Technology | Search

 


Promising signs in UC research into treating ovarian cancer

Promising signs in UC research into treating ovarian cancer

October 17, 2012

A University of Canterbury (UC) research project in collaboration with the Christchurch School of Medicine has shown some promising signs in the treatment of ovarian cancer.

UC student researcher Simon Hogg said ovarian cancer was a challenging disease to treat and was classed as the most lethal gynaecological cancer.

Without effective methods for screening and early detection, patients are typically not diagnosed until the disease has spread beyond the ovary and can become resistant to anti-cancer drugs. There is a desperate need for a new anti-cancer drug to improve the survival of women with advanced disease, Hogg said today.

He said his research found that naturally-occurring compounds could be employed to fight ovarian cancer.

``We are beginning to realise the clinical potential of these compounds. My study adds to a growing body of knowledge identifying naturally-occurring compounds in our diet which help fight against cancer. This is an exciting opportunity because compared to many synthetic drugs, naturally-occurring compounds are cheap, non-toxic, and easily accessible to the general public.

``Ongoing research at UC in collaboration with Dr Kenny Chitcholtan from the Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology at the Christchurch School of Medicine aims to shed further light on compounds present in food and beverages that may be useful for entirely natural therapeutic interventions.

``Data I collected is consistent with the idea that lifestyle factors are associated with the rates of certain cancers, notably through dietary exposure. The identification of these compounds present in food and beverages that play anti-tumour roles against cancer is important for completing our understanding of the disease itself and guiding the design of new therapeutics.’’

Hogg’s research, supervised by UC’s Dr Ashley Garrill, studied the anti-tumour effects in advanced ovarian cancer cells. Results from his study suggested further investigation was warranted.

``The compounds used in my research were all naturally-occurring compounds produced by plants. The problem was that the compound (resveratrol) was quickly eliminated from the body before it could exert a beneficial effect.

``My results are significant as they suggest acetyl-resveratrol has similar anti-tumour activity to the parental compound, resveratrol. I believe that natural-occurring compounds are a feasible source of chemicals that can be employed to fight cancer,’’ Hogg said.

He will deliver his findings at the UC’s annual science biology conference on campus today.
ends

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Business Headlines | Sci-Tech Headlines

 

Sky City : Auckland Convention Centre Cost Jumps By A Fifth

SkyCity Entertainment Group, the casino and hotel operator, is in talks with the government on how to fund the increased cost of as much as $130 million to build an international convention centre in downtown Auckland, with further gambling concessions ruled out. The Auckland-based company has increased its estimate to build the centre to between $470 million and $530 million as the construction boom across the country drives up building costs and design changes add to the bill.
More>>

ALSO:

RMTU: Mediation Between Lyttelton Port And Union Fails

The Rail and Maritime Union (RMTU) has opted to continue its overtime ban indefinitely after mediation with the Lyttelton Port of Christchurch (LPC) failed to progress collective bargaining. More>>

Earlier:

Science Policy: Callaghan, NSC Funding Knocked In Submissions

Callaghan Innovation, which was last year allocated a budget of $566 million over four years to dish out research and development grants, and the National Science Challenges attracted criticism in submissions on the government’s draft national statement of science investment, with science funding largely seen as too fragmented. More>>

ALSO:

Scoop Business: Spark, Voda And Telstra To Lay New Trans-Tasman Cable

Spark New Zealand and Vodafone, New Zealand’s two dominant telecommunications providers, in partnership with Australian provider Telstra, will spend US$70 million building a trans-Tasman submarine cable to bolster broadband traffic between the neighbouring countries and the rest of the world. More>>

ALSO:

More:

Statistics: Current Account Deficit Widens

New Zealand's annual current account deficit was $6.1 billion (2.6 percent of GDP) for the year ended September 2014. This compares with a deficit of $5.8 billion (2.5 percent of GDP) for the year ended June 2014. More>>

ALSO:

Still In The Red: NZ Govt Shunts Out Surplus To 2016

The New Zealand government has pushed out its targeted return to surplus for a year as falling dairy prices and a low inflation environment has kept a lid on its rising tax take, but is still dangling a possible tax cut in 2017, the next election year and promising to try and achieve the surplus pledge on which it campaigned for election in September. More>>

ALSO:

Job Insecurity: Time For Jobs That Count In The Meat Industry

“Meat Workers face it all”, says Graham Cooke, Meat Workers Union National Secretary. “Seasonal work, dangerous jobs, casual and zero hours contracts, and increasing pressure on workers to join non-union individual agreements. More>>

ALSO:

Get More From Scoop

 
 
Standards New Zealand

Standards New Zealand
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Sci-Tech
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news