Video | Business Headlines | Internet | Science | Scientific Ethics | Technology | Search

 

Promising signs in UC research into treating ovarian cancer

Promising signs in UC research into treating ovarian cancer

October 17, 2012

A University of Canterbury (UC) research project in collaboration with the Christchurch School of Medicine has shown some promising signs in the treatment of ovarian cancer.

UC student researcher Simon Hogg said ovarian cancer was a challenging disease to treat and was classed as the most lethal gynaecological cancer.

Without effective methods for screening and early detection, patients are typically not diagnosed until the disease has spread beyond the ovary and can become resistant to anti-cancer drugs. There is a desperate need for a new anti-cancer drug to improve the survival of women with advanced disease, Hogg said today.

He said his research found that naturally-occurring compounds could be employed to fight ovarian cancer.

``We are beginning to realise the clinical potential of these compounds. My study adds to a growing body of knowledge identifying naturally-occurring compounds in our diet which help fight against cancer. This is an exciting opportunity because compared to many synthetic drugs, naturally-occurring compounds are cheap, non-toxic, and easily accessible to the general public.

``Ongoing research at UC in collaboration with Dr Kenny Chitcholtan from the Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology at the Christchurch School of Medicine aims to shed further light on compounds present in food and beverages that may be useful for entirely natural therapeutic interventions.

``Data I collected is consistent with the idea that lifestyle factors are associated with the rates of certain cancers, notably through dietary exposure. The identification of these compounds present in food and beverages that play anti-tumour roles against cancer is important for completing our understanding of the disease itself and guiding the design of new therapeutics.’’

Hogg’s research, supervised by UC’s Dr Ashley Garrill, studied the anti-tumour effects in advanced ovarian cancer cells. Results from his study suggested further investigation was warranted.

``The compounds used in my research were all naturally-occurring compounds produced by plants. The problem was that the compound (resveratrol) was quickly eliminated from the body before it could exert a beneficial effect.

``My results are significant as they suggest acetyl-resveratrol has similar anti-tumour activity to the parental compound, resveratrol. I believe that natural-occurring compounds are a feasible source of chemicals that can be employed to fight cancer,’’ Hogg said.

He will deliver his findings at the UC’s annual science biology conference on campus today.
ends

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Business Headlines | Sci-Tech Headlines

 

Quake Insurance: Reforms To EQC Act Announced

· Increasing the monetary cap from $100,000 (plus GST) to $150,000 (plus GST) for EQC building cover.
· Clarifying EQC land cover is for natural disaster damage that directly affects the insured residence or access to it... More>>

ALSO:

Reserve Bank: Official Cash Rate Unchanged At 1.75 Percent

Global economic growth has increased and become more broad-based. However, major challenges remain with on-going surplus capacity and extensive political uncertainty... More>>

Kaikōura Earthquake: Private Insurers Receive $1.8b Claims

Insurance Council Chief Executive Tim Grafton said most is for commercial loss at $1.36 billion, with residential claims amounting to over $460 million. “...We have a high level of confidence that most people will have received settlement offers by the end of this year." More>>

ALSO:

Forms And Data: New Proposals To Simplify Personal Income Tax

The Government is proposing to make tax simpler for individuals, with people whose only income is from a salary, wages or investments no longer being required to file tax returns to receive tax refunds or to calculate any additional tax. More>>

OECD: NZ Economic Expansion Faces Long Term Challenges

The OECD Economic Survey of New Zealand discusses the gap between the strong short-term outlook and long-term challenges posed by low productivity growth and a changing labour market. More>>

ALSO:

GDP: